Tag Archives: Twitter

Twitter is Removing Locked Accounts from Your Follower Count



Twitter announced that it is removing locked accounts from follower counts across profiles globally. This is being done as part of Twitter’s ongoing effort to build trust and encourage healthy conversation on Twitter.

Over the years, we’ve locked accounts when we detected sudden changes in account behavior. In these situations, we reach out to the owners of the accounts and unless they validate the account and reset their passwords, we keep them locked with no ability to log in. This week, we will be removing these locked accounts from follower counts across profiles globally. As a result, the number of followers displayed on many profiles may go down.

Twitter says that most people will see a change of four followers or fewer. Those who have larger follower counts will experience a more significant drop. In short, if you happen to notice that you have a smaller number of followers than before – this could be the reason why.

Locked accounts are ones in which Twitter has detected sudden changes in account behavior. Twitter may lock the account and contact the owner to confirm that they still have control over the account. Sudden changes in behavior may include: tweeting a large volume of unsolicited replies or mentions, tweeting misleading links, or if a large number of accounts block the account after mentioning them.

Twitter sometimes locks an account if they “see email and password combinations from other services posted online and believe that information could put the security of an account at risk.” When that happens, Twitter requires those accounts to change their passwords for protection. Until Twitter confirms that everything is ok, they lock the account – which makes them unable to tweet or see ads.

The accounts Twitter is focusing on are not bot accounts. Instead, these are accounts that were created by real people – but Twitter cannot confirm that the original person who opened the account still has control and access to it.


Twitter Made Changes to Encourage Healthy Conversations



Twitter announced a new approach to how they will handle troll-like behavior that is intended to distort and detract from public conversation on Twitter, particularly in communal areas like conversations and search. Twitter will not remove such content from its service, but will instead put those comments under a “show more replies” link. People will not see those tweets unless they choose to click that link.

In the announcement, Twitter says that “less than 1% of accounts make up the majority of accounts reported for abuse” but that a lot of what is reported doesn’t violate Twitter’s rules. That being said, Twitter is aware that this small number of accounts have a “disproportionately large – and negative – impact on people’s experience on Twitter.”

Today, we use policies, human review processes, and machine learning to help us determine how Tweets are organized and presented in communal places like conversations and search. Now, we’re tackling issues of behaviors that distort and detract from the public conversation in those areas by integrating new behavioral signals into how Tweets are presented. By using new tools to address this conduct from a behavioral perspective, we’re able to improve the health of the conversation, and everyone’s experience on Twitter, without waiting for people who use Twitter to report potential issues to us.

Some of what Twitter is going to take into account include: if an account has not confirmed their email address, if the same person signs up for multiple accounts simultaneously, accounts that repeatedly Tweet and mention accounts that don’t follow them, or behavior that might indicate a coordinated attack. Twitter is also looking at “how accounts are connected to those that violate our rules and how they interact with each other.”

Those signals will now be considered in how Twitter organizes and presents content in communal areas like conversation and search. In short, content that doesn’t technically violate Twitter’s rules, but does disrupt and distort conversation, will be put behind a “show more replies” link. People can choose whether or not they want to click that link. According to Twitter: “The result is that people contributing to the healthy conversation will be more visible in conversations and search.”


Twitter Expanded the Character Limit



Twitter has expanded the number of characters that can fit into a single tweet from 140 to 280. This change is being rolled out “to languages where cramming was an issue.”

Twitter points out that “Japanese, Korean, and Chinese will continue to have 140 characters because cramming is not an issue in these languages. In fact, these languages have always been able to say more with their Tweets because of the density of their writing systems.”

It seems to me that not everyone who uses English on Twitter received the 280 character update right away. Those who have not been given the extra characters to tweet with will get the update eventually.

What will you do with 280 characters? While some people are filling their tweet with emoji, or stretching it out so it takes up a lot of space, others have used the opportunity to post something meaningful.

The Tony Awards tweeted part of the lyrics to “Give My Regards to Broadway”. The Chicago Cubs tweeted their win/loss record. Bob Vorwald, a “Chicago TV sports guy” tweeted the lyrics to “Take Me Out to the Ballgame”. The Twitter account for The Office TV show tweeted out a cry for help. Actor Isiah Whitlock Jr. tweeted his most memorable line from the TV show The Wire.

Love it, or hate it, the 280 character count is here to stay. One one hand, I see it as a good thing because it allows people to be creative and to express more of their thoughts in one tweet. Perhaps we will have fewer need for “Threads”. On the other hand, I fear that this change will enable mean people to spew 280 characters of hate at whomever they choose to attack.


Twitter Twits



All social media platforms have their problems, but I thought this one from Twitter took the biscuit. One tweet from 29 June and 4,100 followers. Does no-one check before following back?

 

Perhaps 600 people did check, hence the discrepancy, but that’s a pretty good (or bad) ratio depending on your point of view. If you follow someone first, 87% of the time, they’ll follow you back.

No, I’m not bitter that I only have 796 followers after 1,532 tweets but if anyone wants to improve my self-esteem, I’m @AndrewhPalmer. I always follow back…oh, wait….


Seven People Trump Blocked on Twitter are Suing Him



Seven people have filed a lawsuit against President Donald Trump after he blocked them from seeing or interacting with his Twitter account. Trump blocked these Twitter users from seeing or interacting with his @realDonaldTrump account – not the @POTUS account. This case presents a unique situation and it will be interesting to see what the outcome will be.

In addition to President Trump, White House press secretary Sean Spicer and White House director of social media Daniel Scavino were named as Defendants in the lawsuit.

The seven blocked people are being represented by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University. The case was filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. A paragraph from the Introduction portion of the lawsuit provides a quick explanation of what this case is about:

“President Trump’s Twitter account, @realDonaldTrump, has become an important source of news and information about the government, and an important public forum for speech by, to, and about the President. In an effort to suppress dissent in this forum, Defendants have excluded – “blocked” – Twitter users who have criticized the President or his policies. This practice is unconstitutional, and this suit seeks to end it.”

The lawsuit describes what each individual plaintiff tweeted @realDonaldTrump before being blocked from viewing or interacting with that Twitter account.

The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University argues that being blocked from the @realDonaldTrump account violated the First Amendment because it imposes a viewpoint-based restriction on the individual Plaintiff’s participation in a public forum. It also argues being blocked prevents Plaintiff’s access to official statements the President otherwise makes available to the general public, and because it imposes a viewpoint-based restriction on the Plaintiff’s ability to petition the government for redress of grievances.

I took a quick look at the @realDonaldTrump Twitter account shortly before posting this. It does not include any tweets about this lawsuit.


All of Your New Twitter Friends are Probably Bots



Twitter logoSocial media is becoming less useful by the day. Nowhere is this more evident than on Twitter. The so-called microblogging service may still serve as an of-the-moment cultural barometer. But what good is that barometer if the gauge it’s built on is fundamentally broken? Twitter’s ability to give us nearly realtime data on trending topics is only really worthwhile if that data is reliable.

And how reliable can that data be if an estimated 48 million Twitter accounts are actually bots? According to a new study, somewhere between 9 and 15 percent of all tweets come from fake accounts. This is just the latest indicator that Twitter itself, and perhaps social media in general, is being ruined by bot masters who serve up all kinds of fake activity to those who’ll pay for it.

Twitter’s own estimate of bots on its platform came in lower than what the study found. According to a recent filing, Twitter stated its bot count is around 8.5 percent. While Twitter’s methodology for bot calculation may be different than the methods used by the researchers who came up with the study, it’s still in Twitter’s interest to have an overall lower bot score.

This study doesn’t do much to improve Twitter’s already shaky reputation as of late. Hopefully, there’s something the social network can do to round up and eject these fake accounts. I guess the real question is, does Twitter even care?