Mark Zuckerberg Defended Leaving Up Trump’s Posts



Facebook and Twitter are very different social media platforms. Recently, the differences have become vividly clear, as we see how each platform chooses how they will respond to controversial content posted by President Trump.

The Verge obtained a recording of an extended conference with employees in which Mark Zuckerberg addressed accusations that Facebook allowed election misinformation and veiled promotions of violence from President Trump. According to The Verge, Mark Zuckerberg stood by what he described as a “pretty thorough” evaluation of Trump’s posts. Zuckerberg reportedly said that the choice to avoid labeling them or removing them was difficult but correct.

As you may have heard, Twitter added a fact-check to two of President Trump’s tweets about mail-in ballots. Twitter also flagged another tweet made by President Trump because it violated Twitter’s rules about glorifying violence. It should be noted that all three of those tweets are still on Twitter. Those who want to read them can simply click a link to view them.

There has been some pushback. President Trump issued an executive order that some see as intended to curtail free speech on Twitter’s platform. Personally, I think that President Trump should have read Twitter’s policies about what is, and is not, allowed on their platform. If he had done that, and acted accordingly, there would be no need for that executive order.

The Guardian reported that Facebook staff held a virtual walkout to show their disagreement with Mark Zuckerberg’s decision regarding posts by President Trump. Some took to Twitter to express their displeasure. Facebook Software Engineer Timothy J. Aveni, resigned in response to Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to leave up Trump’s post that called for violence. The Hill reported that Owen Anderson, another Facebook employee, announced his departure from the company on Twitter.

Overall, I think that people who are fans of President Trump are going to take his side of the situation no matter what. Those who dislike Facebook and/or Mark Zuckerberg’s decision making process, might choose to leave that platform. Those angry with Twitter may quit that platform. None of this is going to lead to healthier versions of either Facebook or Twitter, and I miss the days before the politicians invaded social media.


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