Tag Archives: Facebook

Facebook has New Requirements for Page Managers



Facebook announced that they have introduced Page publishing authorization starting with people who manage a Page with a large audience in the United States. In addition, Facebook is also adding primary country location and Page merge details to the Page Info tab (that was introduced in June of 2018).

Why is Facebook doing this? The answer to that question is at the end of their blog post. “Our goal is to prevent organizations and individuals from creating accounts that mislead people about who they are and what they’re doing.”

Now, people who manage these pages will be asked to complete an authorization process in order to continue to post, making it harder for people to administer a Page using a fake or compromised account.

Authorization asks people who manage these Pages to secure their account with two-factor authentication and confirm their primary country location.

Facebook says that if a Page manager requires authorization, they’ll receive a notice at the top of their News Feed to begin the process. People won’t be able to post on their Page if they don’t complete the process. Facebook says: “Enforcement will follow shortly this month.”

In addition, Facebook is adding more Page Info that will show when a Page has merged with another Page. This information will be found under Page History. Facebook is also adding a section called People Who Manage This Page. It will show the primary country locations Pages are managed from. This will initially appear on Pages with a large US audience.

Facebook points out that Instagram will introduce similar features in the coming weeks, which will allow people to see more information about accounts with large audiences.


Crossposting Tweets to Facebook has been Disabled



People who use both Facebook and Twitter may have noticed that they cannot crosspost their tweets to Facebook anymore. The reason is because crossposting tweets to Facebook has been disabled.

Reuters tweeted a video in which they reported that Twitter users will now be required to copy the URL of any tweet that they want to share on their Facebook news feed. Reuters states that this issue is due to Facebook’s lockdown of its API platform, which was done in response to the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Several websites pointed to a post on the Facebook for Developers website that was published in April. It includes a summary of APIs that were undergoing updates, and states that Facebook will remove older API endpoints that have not been used anymore by apps.

TechCrunch reported: “One of those changes involves Facebook Login, announced back in April. The company said that apps that had been granted permission to publish posts to Facebook as the logged-in user would no longer have that permission. New apps wouldn’t be able to use this feature the day the change was announced.”

On August 1, 2018, Twitter Support tweeted “We’ve learned that Tweets and Retweets will no longer automatically post to connected Facebook accounts due to a recent Facebook update. Don’t worry, you have other ways to share a tweet.”

The Twitter Support tweet included a link to a Twitter post: called “How to share a Tweet”. The post explains how to share a tweet via direct message, and how to share a tweet via SMS or email. This advice is not going to help people who want to be able to automatically crosspost their tweets to Facebook.


Facebook Introduced Groups for Admins



Facebook has introduced a new feature to support group admins. Right now, Facebook is piloting subscriptions with a small number of groups.

Facebook says that group admins have said they are looking for ways to help them earn money to deepen engagement with their members and to continue to support their communities. Facebook states that many admins do this by creating an additional subscribers-only group alongside their existing group. Then, they rely on additional tools to track and collect payments.

Subscription groups were created to make it easier for admins to provide these experiences with built-in tools, and to save them time so they can focus on offering members-only content. For members, they’re now able to sign-up and manage their subscription through the Facebook app for iOS and Android.

Subscription groups align with the experience that Facebook made available to support video creators earlier this year, and is part of Facebook’s overall approach to helping creators and leaders to financially support the work they do to engage their fans and communities.

The subscription groups pilot is testing with a small number of groups across a range of interests who will share input and feedback along the way. They include: Grown and Flown Parents: College Admissions and Affordability (a dedicated college preparation group), and Meal Planning Central Premium (that includes weekly meal plans, shopping lists by preferred grocery store), and more.


Facebook Announced that it is Removing Trending



Facebook announced that it is removing Trending soon to make way for future news experiences. Trending was launched in 2014 as a way to help people discover news topics that were popular across the Facebook community. Facebook is exploring ways to help people stay informed on Facebook.

However, it was only available in five countries and accounted for less than 1.5% of clicks to news publishers on average. From research we found that over time people found the product to be less and less useful. We will remove Trending from Facebook next week and we will also remove products and third-party partner integrations that rely on the Trends API.

Facebook has described Trending as something that helps people discover interesting and relevant topics being discussed on Facebook that might not appear in their News Feed. Trending shows Facebook users a list of topics that have recently become popular on Facebook.

Facebook says that the way people consume news on Facebook now is changing, and is primarily on mobile and increasingly through news video. As such, they are exploring new ways to help people stay informed about news. Some examples include:

Breaking News Label: It is a test Facebook is running with 80 publishers across North America, South America, Europe, India, and Australia that lets publishers put a “breaking news” indicator on their posts in News Feed.

Today In: A dedicated section that features the latest breaking and important news from local publishers in your city (as well as updates from local officials and organizations).

News Video in Watch: Facebook will soon have a dedicated section in Facebook Watch in the US where people can view live coverage, daily news briefings and weekly deep dives that are exclusive to Watch.


Facebook Imposes Restrictions on Ads and Pages



Facebook announced changes to the way the company manages ads and pages on Facebook and Instagram. The purpose is to increase transparency and accountability – and to prevent election interference.

Last October, Facebook announced that only authorized advertisers would be able to run electoral ads on Facebook and Instagram. Now, Facebook is extending that requirement to anyone who wants to show “issue ads”.

Facebook describes “issue ads” as “political topics that are being debated across the country.” To get authorized by Facebook, advertisers will need to confirm their identity and location. Advertisers will be prohibited from running political ads – electoral or issue based – until they are authorized.

Those kinds of ads on Facebook and Instagram will be clearly labeled in the top left corner as “Political Ad”. Next to that label, Facebook will show “paid for by” information. Facebook users who live in the United States will start seeing the label and additional information on those kinds of ads later this spring.

Facebook has invested in artificial intelligence and has added more people to find advertisers who didn’t go through the authorization process. Facebook users who see an unlabeled political ad will be able to report it.

In Canada, Facebook has been testing a new feature called View Ads. It allows users to see the ads that a Page is running – even if that Page is not in your News Feed. This applies to all advertiser Pages on Facebook and is not limited to Pages that are running political ads.

The View Ads feature will launch globally in June, along with a public, searchable, political ad archive. It will contain all ads with the “Political Ad” label, and show the image and text, as well as additional information like the amount spent and demographic audience information for each ad.

In addition, Facebook is now requiring people who manage Pages with large numbers of users to be verified. Those who manage large Pages and do not clear the process will no longer be able to post. This is intended to make it harder for people to administer a Page using a fake account. Facebook will now show additional context about Pages, including whether a Page has changed its name.


Mozilla Created a Facebook Container Extension



Mozilla has created the Facebook Container Extension It functions similarly to Mozilla’s Multi-Account Containers. The Facebook Container Extension was designed specifically to help Firefox users have more control of their data on Facebook.

The Facebook Container Extension helps people who are using Firefox to control more of their web activity from Facebook by isolating your identity into a separate container. Mozilla says this makes it harder for Facebook to track your activity on other websites via third-party cookies.

Rather than stop using a service you find valuable and miss out on those adorable photos of your nephew, we think you should have tools to limit what data others can collect about you. That includes us: Mozilla does not collect data from your use of the Facebook Container extension. We only know the number of times the extension is installed or removed.

When you install the Facebook Container Extension, it will delete your Facebook cookies and log you out of Facebook. The next time you visit Facebook, it will open in a new blue-colored browser (the “container tab). In that tab, you can login and use Facebook as you normally would. If you click on a non-Facebook link, it will load outside of the container.

I think this is a useful tool for people who value their privacy but do not want to stop using Facebook. It can be difficult to quit using Facebook if it is the most reliable way to contact members of your family.

It should be noted that the Facebook Container Extension is for Firefox. It won’t work on other browsers. The Mozilla blog points out that if you click on any Facebook Share buttons or other browser tabs it will load within the Facebook container. When you use those buttons, information will be sent to Facebook about the website that you shared from.


Facebook is ESL’s Main Broadcasting Platform



ESL, the world’s largest esports company announced that it will bring content from two of the top esports competitions exclusively to Facebook in 2018. Facebook will be their main broadcast partner.

WESA, the World Esports Association, along with ESL, announced that the world’s top Counter-Strike: Global Offensive competition, CS:GO Pro League, will be broadcast exclusively on Facebook, kicking off with the upcoming Season Seven. Distribution will begin on February 13, 2018, and will run for four seasons of Pro League, through December 2019.

ESL will also broadcast one of its flagship circuits, ESL One on Facebook, featuring Dota 2 and CS:GO. The first event this year will be ESL One Genting 2018, taking place January 23-28, 2018, bringing 16 of the world’s best Dota 2 teams to Malaysia for a six day event. Additionally, ESL will produce and broadcast a weekly five-minute show celebrating the Dota community on Facebook Watch, Facebook’s platform for shows.

Competitions will be streamed exclusively via Facebook Live in English and Portuguese, with other languages available as well. All live broadcasts from CS:GO Pro League and ESL One will be available in 1080p/60fps on Facebook. Both Pro League and ESL One will also be streamed in VR.

ESL will also leverage Facebook’s innovative cross-posting feature. With cross-posting, ESL can easily post videos and reach audiences on all participating team and player Pages. The feature will work with live and 360 video, and it will be available soon for videos that were previously live.

Although Facebook users will have the easiest time finding and following the action within the platform, it is not required to have a Facebook account to watch Pro League or ESL One. Embedded streams will continue to be shown on the respective product pages.


Facebook Acquired the tbh App



The tbh app is popular with teenagers. This probably explains why I had not heard of it before TechCrunch reported that Facebook had acquired tbh. According to TechCrunch, tbh has had 5 million downloads and 2.5 million daily active users in the past nine weeks.

The letters tbh stand for “to be honest”. It was first launched on August 3, 2017, in the state of Georgia. Since then, tbh has rolled out the availability the app in more states. The plan was to eventually support a national audience.

You can download the tbh app for free from the App Store. The purpose of tbh is for people to give anonymous, positive, feedback to their friends. Feedback is given in response to positive multiple-choice polls about friends. Those friends will receive the poll results as compliments.

There is an announcement on the tbh website about tbh joining Facebook. The key part states:

Today we’re announcing that we’re joining Facebook to continue our mission. When we met with Facebook, we realized that we shared many of the same core values about connecting people through positive interactions. Most of all, we were compelled by the ways they could help us realize tbh’s vision and bring it to more people.

Those who are currently using the tbh app are assured that their experience with tbh won’t change as a result of tbh joining Facebook. According to tbh, they will continue to build features that their users love – “now with plenty more resources.”


Facebook to Add More Staff to Monitor Facebook Live



When I first heard about Facebook Live, I thought it would be a good thing for people who like to play video games and livestream it in a way that made it easy for their Facebook friends to watch. Unfortunately, there are some people out there who have been using Facebook Live to commit acts of violence. Mark Zuckerberg says that Facebook will hire more staff to monitor Facebook live.

In a Facebook post on his verified Facebook page, Mark Zuckerberg makes it clear that he is aware of the bad things that have happened on Facebook Live – and states what Facebook will do about it.

Over the last few weeks, we’ve seen people hurting themselves and others on Facebook – either live or in video posted later. It’s heartbreaking, and I’ve been reflecting on how we can do better for our community.

If we’re going to build a safe community, we need to respond quickly. We’re working to make these videos easier to report so we can take the right action sooner – whether that’s responding quickly when someone needs help or taking a post down.

Over the next year, we’ll be adding 3,000 people to our community operations team around the world – on top of the 4,500 we have today – to review the millions of reports we get every week, and improve the process for doing it quickly.

These reviewers will also help us get better at removing things we don’t allow on Facebook like hate speech and child exploitation. And we’ll keep working with local community groups and law enforcement who are in the best position to help someone if they need it – either because they’re about to harm themselves, or because they are in danger from someone else.

In addition to investing in more people, we’re also building better tools to keep our community safe. We’re going to make it simpler to report problems to us, faster for our reviewers to determine which posts violate our standards and easier for them to contact law enforcement if someone needs help. As these become available they should help make our community safer.

Mark Zuckerberg goes on to point out that Facebook got a report that someone on Facebook Live was considering suicide. They were able to reach out to law enforcement, who helped prevent that person from harming himself.

I read some of the comments left on Zuckerberg’s post. Some people are very happy to see these upcoming changes take effect. Others would like Facebook Live shut down so that no one can use it to try and get attention by engaging in violence. Those comments inspired other people to insist that Facebook Live should not be shut down because they are using it to connect with family members who live far away.

In some ways, I feel like we’ve heard this before. A few of the commenters said that they have been reporting hate speech, and that Facebook doesn’t do anything about it.  Forbes points out that Facebook has long had a problem with people using the platform for illegal gun sales.  Facebook’s Community Standards specifically state that users are prohibited from selling firearms or ammunition on Facebook.


Creators of Rocksmith Respond to Facebook Trolls



Rocksmith logoIt’s pretty much a given that if you do anything online that attracts an audience, you’ll run into internet trolls whose sole purpose is to harass you. This problem is as old as the internet itself, and it’s only gotten worse in the age of social media.

There are a lot of different ways to handle ‘net trolls. The old adage, “Don’t feed the trolls,” advises that simply ignoring troll commentary is the best way to go. Direct engagement rarely works, as trolls will use these interactions as an excuse to keep the harassment loop going. The truly brave (and patient) may try another route when it comes to trolls; An appeal to reason.

That third option was recently implemented by the makers of Rocksmith, a guitar-instruction program available on many platforms. Rocksmith offers up many songs by popular recording artists that can be downloaded and used within the program. And every time Rocksmith would announce new downloadable songs, the trolls would come out in force to complain about Rocksmith’s latest song selections.

Rocksmith recently responded to these naysayers on its Facebook page:

Folks, we’re going to say this as nicely as we can: Nobody cares what you don’t like.

Okay, now that we read it, that doesn’t seem all that nice. But it’s something worth considering before you post on our page and tell the world that whatever artist, song, or genre currently being discussed is “garbage,” “fake,” “worthless,” or any other negative adjective you can dream up. “Real,” “good,” “fake,” “bad” – none of that holds any power here. That’s simply not how we see music.

As the moderators of this page, our philosophy is simple: There’s music that inspires you to play guitar and bass, and there’s music that does not. We don’t make DLC based on what you *dislike* — we only make DLC based on what people actually tell us they want. That’s why we have a request app, embedded on this page – so you can offer specific song suggestions directly to the team. But once something’s released, it’s there for the people who want it. If that’s not you…honestly, we don’t need to know. Knowing what you’d rather see in the future is far more valuable. Something good could come from that. Nothing good comes from you suggesting that your entirely subjective taste in music is superior to everyone else’s.

What’s more, in all the time we’ve moderated this page, we have never seen someone respond to a “your band sucks” post with “Now that you mention it, I don’t like my favorite band anymore.” You cannot stop people from connecting with music; it’s a personal, emotional relationship, and it’s a fight you cannot win. It’s not a fight we want to host on our page, either. Don’t pick that fight here.

If it helps, think of Rocksmith like a restaurant. Check the menu, then choose only the items that seem appetizing. You’re not expected to order everything on the menu, and if you were to say “take this off the menu because I don’t personally want to eat it,” you’d get funny looks. If it’s not to your taste, just look for something else that is. Our menu has nearly 1,000 options for millions of customers, each hungry for something different, and we add to the menu every week. If you find something that doesn’t appeal to your tastes…keep looking. There’s gotta be something on that menu for you. There’s something for everybody else, too.

So, please: Before you waste any time or energy insulting music that does not inspire you to play — for the good of your own community — stop, and shift gears. Nobody cares what you don’t like, but there’s plenty of other things we can talk about.

Thanks.

Rocksmith’s response to troll comments is succinct and on point. Instead of lashing out, the message explains why positivity (telling Rocksmith what songs you’d like to see in the future) is so much better than negativity (telling Rocksmith why you hate the new songs they’ve added).

I hope this message helps to keep the trolls at bay, at least for a little while, on the Rocksmith page. This message also serves as a good example to other companies who are dealing with similar problems on social media.