Tag Archives: WhatsApp

WhatsApp Users Can Delete Messages Up To 2 Days After Sending It



WhatsApp tweeted: “Rethinking your message? Now you’ll have a little over 2 days to delete your messages from your chats after you hit send.” At a glance, it looked as though some Twitter users were happy about this announcement while others were unsure what they thought about it.

9To5Mac reported that while iMessage is getting the option to “unsend” messages for the first time with iOS 16 beta, WhatsApp already provides a similar feature. However, the Meta (Facebook)-owned messaging app is now releasing an update that will let users delete messages up to two days after they were sent.

According to 9to5Mac, WhatsApp users will have 2 days and 12 hours to delete a message after sending it. Previously, this limit was only 1 hour, 8 minutes, and 16 seconds- that was specific. In order to delete a message sent in WhatsApp, all you need to do is tap and hold it for a few seconds, then tap the “Delete” button.

9to5Mac also stated that In the first beta versions of iOS 16, users had 15 minutes to unsend a message. Now with the latest betas, this limit has been reduced to only two minutes. WhatsApp and iMessage competitor Telegram lets users edit and delete messages without any limits.

The Verge provided more details. To start using the new WhatsApp feature right now, open up the WhatsApp group or individual chat where you sent the message(s). Make sure to tap and hold the content you want to get rid of, click “Delete,” and then select either “Delete for everyone” or “Delete for me.”

The Verge also reported in order to use the “Delete” options, you have to be updated to the most recent version of WhatsApp in order for this to work. And you won’t actually receive a notification if the message didn’t delete.

Overall, the best way to be comfortable on social media is to never post something that you wouldn’t want the world to see. Try and avoid saying mean things about a mutual friend who also uses WhatsApp. The thing you said could be passed around by one or more of your other WhatsApp friends.

You also shouldn’t post NSFW content, or details about whatever crime you want to commit (or have already committed) on any social media site. The first one might lead to embarrassment for yourself (and potentially others who saw it). The second one could potentially connect you to whatever crime you intended to do (or already did).

In short, be smart! Don’t post personal things on social media, especially in a public post.


WhatsApp Rolls Out More Emoji



Ahead of World Emoji Day (Sunday, July 17) Emojipedia reported that WhatsApp is getting more emojii. World Emoji Day is the annual celebration of emoji use across the world. Created and hosted by Emojipedia, the event is in its ninth year and is celebrated on July 17th each year.

In addition, Emojipedia also stated that Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg has announced that WhatsApp will be updating its emoji reactions feature for both iOS and Android devices. This new update will allow users to react to messages from any emoji included within their emoji keyboards.

According to Emojipedia, the update is now rolling out across select global regions and is expected to reach all of WhatsApp’s global userbase in the coming weeks and months.

After a WhatsApp user downloads the emoji update, they can press and hold on a message within WhatsApp to make the reaction menu appear as before – but now it will feature a + option, which allows users to dive into the 3,600+ currently available emojis, including all skin tone modifier options.

Emojipedia also noted that the expansion of the WhatsApp reaction feature mirrors a feature currently available for Instagram users in select regions, which allows any emoji from the emoji keyboard to be used as a reaction to a direct message on the platform. (Meta is the parent company of Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram.)

TechCrunch reported that WhatsApp first announced its emoji reaction feature in April, but started to make it available to everyone in May. At that time, you could only react via six available emoji: thumbs up, heart, joined hands, tears of joy, mouth open and crying face.

Engadget reported that the WhatsApp emoji update put it on par with Messenger in terms of emoji reactions, and works the same way on mobile. According to Engadget, Telegram recently unveiled expanded emoji and animated reactions as well, but you have to subscribe to Telegram’s new $5/month premium service to access them.

Personally, I don’t tend to use a whole lot of emoji. On Twitter, I am most likely going to click the heart-shaped “like” rather than post an emoji in response to someone else’s tweet. The Mastodon instance I’m on has tons of user-created emoji, and I use several of them to express a mood. If I’m using Instagram, I typically click the “heart” button on content that amuses me.

It is a good idea to understand how a specific emoji is interpreted by other people. For example, I’ve seen screenshots of the “Face With Tears” emoji being used on obituaries that were posted in social media. Apparently, some people think it is expressing tears of grief, and are unaware that others will see that as tears of laughter.


WhatsApp Now Lets You Transfer Your Chat History From Android to iPhone



Today, Mark Zuckerberg wrote on Facebook, “We’re adding to WhatsApp the ability to securely switch between phones and transfer your chat history, photos, and voice messages between Android and iPhone while maintaining end-to-end encryption. This is a top requested feature. We launched the ability to switch from iPhone —-> iPhone as well.”

It appears that this was first spotted by the WABBetaInfo website. It provided information for people who want to migrate their chat history from Android to iOS. The first thing to know is that you need to have at least Android 5 installed on your Android device and iOS 15.5 on your iPhone.WABBetaInfo says that since iOS 16 is a beta version, it is not guaranteed that it will work since WhatsApp does not provide support for beta versions of iOS.

When you transfer your chat history across different platforms, WhatsApp is not able to see the data you transfer. In addition, you need to manually enable the end-to-end encrypted backup option right within WhatsApp for iPhone if you want, even if you already enabled encrypted backups on WhatsApp for Android.

The Verge points out that if you already have a preexisting iOS chat history, then the imported Android history will overwrite it. That’s definitely something to consider if you are someone who likes to save your chats.

Engadget reported that the WhatsApp feature will help you move your content over from Android to iOS. It will be part of Apple’s existing “Move to iOS” tool. To be clear, WhatsApp’s feature is available as a beta for now, so you may encounter bugs during the transfer process.

According to Engadget, when you select WhatsApp, it will open automatically and prompt you to give permission to move your data over to iOS. Depending on the amount of content you have, it’ll take awhile to package everything up and transfer it to your iPhone. Apple will also pre-load the WhatsApp icon on your home page so you can just tap it to finish installing it on your new iPhone, instead of having to go through the App Store.

TechCrunch reported that the process you use to transfer to iOS also can be used to transfer your account information, profile picture, individual chats, group chats, chat history, media and settings. However, you can’t transfer your call history or display name.

Overall, it sounds to me like the ability to transfer your WhatsApp information from Android to iOS could be enticing for people who were already thinking about getting an iPhone. One thing to keep in mind is that Meta (parent company of Facebook and Instagram) owns WhatsApp.


WhatsApp Announced New Features



WhatsApp announced that they are excited to share that emoji reactions are now available on the latest version of the app. Reactions are fun, fast, and they reduce overload in groups too. WhatsApp will continue improving them by adding an even broader range of expressions in the future.

In addition, you can now send files within WhatsApp up to 2GB in size at a time, protected by end-to-end encryption. This is an increase from the previous limit of 100MB and we think it will be helpful for collaboration among small businesses and school groups. We recommend using WiFi for larger files and we’ll display a counter while uploading or downloading to let you know how long your transfer will take.

WhatsApp is also giving users the option to add more people to a chat, which was one of their top requests from users. WhatsApp is slowly rolling out the ability to add up to 512 people to a group. Building private, safe, and secure communities takes work and WhatsApp thinks this series of improvements will help people and groups to stay close to one another.

To me, it sounds like WhatsApp is trying to compete with Twitter’s recently announced a feature called Twitter Circle. It lets Twitter users add up to 150 close friends – who will be the only ones that can see the tweets you put into your Circle. WhatsApp allows 512 people in their chats, which might be appealing for those who want to be able to add more than the 150 that Twitter allows.

9to5Mac reported that WhatsApp users in Brazil will have to wait a few months more for the new features. According to 9to5Mac, WhatsApp stated: “Based solely on our long-term strategy for Brazil, this last functionality will only be implemented after being tested in other markets”.

That “last functionality” appears to be the ability to add up to 512 people to a group. 9to5Mac stated: As a matter of fact, with presidential elections coming in October, this is part of the Brazilian Superior Court’s attempt to prevent the spread of fake news and misinformation through groups – as it occurs in other apps, such as Telegram.

Mashable reported that last month WhatsApp announced Communities, which are another way to expand group chats by knitting Groups together into a Community – just like Slack.

I have never used WhatsApp, but I can see where it would be appealing to be able to use emoji Reactions on it. The ability to send files up to 2GB in size at a time could be useful for artists who want to show their latest painting, drawing or photo to specific friends. WhatsApp says those files would be protected by end-to-end encryption, which might make people feel more secure about sharing those kinds of files.

On May 3, WhatsApp tweeted: “Pro-tip: Now you can put 32 of your favorite people in ONE voice call. Sharing good news with your whole family means hearing all the joy and laughter in one easy call.” I can see where this feature would be useful, but it’s not for me.


WhatsApp Lets Users Control How Long Messages Stick Around



WhatsApp announced that they are providing users with more options to control their messages and how long they stick around, with default disappearing messages and multiple durations. This makes sense considering that WhatsApp introduced disappearing messages last year, and a way for photos and videos to immediately disappear after being viewed once.

WhatsApp users will now have the option to turn on disappearing messages by default for all new chats. When enabled, all new one-on-one chats you or another person start will be set to disappear at your chosen duration, and we’ve added a new option when creating a group chat that lets you turn it on for groups you create. This new feature does not change or delete any of your existing chats.

Two new durations for disappearing messages have been added: 24 hours and 90 days, as well as the existing option of 7 days. If you want to enable the new durations, or change the ones you have, go to Privacy and select “Default Message Timer”.

Based on WhatsApp’s blog post, it appears these decisions may have been influenced by the pandemic. The company wrote, “Living apart from family and friends for over a year has made it clearer than ever that just because we can’t physically talk in person, it doesn’t mean we should have to sacrifice the privacy of our personal conversations.”

The WhatsApp blog also states: “We believe disappearing messages along with end-to-end encryption are two crucial features that define what it means to be a private messaging service today, and bring us one step closer to the feeling of an in-personal conversation.”

The Verge pointed out that WhatsApp is owned by Meta (along with Facebook and Instagram). If you don’t currently use Facebook products, you might want to consider if you trust Meta enough to do the right thing with your data.


WhatsApp Users Must Comply with Update or Lose App’s Functionality



WhatsApp issued a privacy policy that will go into effect on May 15, 2021. Those who have not agreed to the policy will slowly have portions of the functionality of WhatsApp become inaccessible.

To me, it sounds like WhatsApp (and its parent company, Facebook) are using this tactic to pressure users into accepting the privacy policy.This could backfire if people choose leave WhatsApp in favor of similar apps like Signal and Telegram.

For the last several weeks we’ve displayed a notification in WhatsApp providing more information about the update. After giving everyone time to review, we’re continuing to remind those who haven’t had the chance to do so to review and accept. After a period of several weeks, the reminder people receive will eventually become persistent.

A post on the WhatsApp website explains what will happen to users who don’t accept the privacy policy on May 15, 2021:

No one will have their account deleted or lose functionality of WhatsApp on May 15th because of this update.

After receiving a persistent reminder, users will encounter limited functionality on WhatsApp until you accept the updates. It appears this will not happen to all users at the same time,

Here is what non-complying users will experience:

  • You won’t be able to access your chat list, but you can still answer incoming phone and video calls. If you have notifications enabled, you can tap on them to read or respond to a message or call back a missed phone or video call.
  • After a few weeks of limited functionality, you won’t be able to receive incoming calls or notifications and WhatsApp will stop sending messages and calls to your phone.

In short, if you want to continue using WhatsApp – and have access to all of its functionality – you have no choice other than to accept the privacy policy. This is not a good look for WhatsApp (or Facebook). I understand that WhatsApp and Facebook have a right to create privacy policies. I think they should have handled this situation in a kinder, more ethical, way.


FTC Sues Facebook for Illegal Monopolization



The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it has sued Facebook. The FTC alleges that Facebook is illegally maintaining its personal social network monopoly through a years-long course of anticompetitive conduct. The lawsuit comes after a lengthy investigation in cooperation with a coalition of attorneys general of 46 states, the District of Columbia, and Guam.

The FTC is seeking a permanent injunction in federal court that could, among other things: require divestitures of assets, including Instagram and WhatsApp; prohibit Facebook from imposing anticompetitive conditions on software developers; and require Facebook to seek prior notice and approval for future mergers and acquisitions.

A separate lawsuit is led by New York Attorney General Letitia James, who stated that: “The lawsuit alleges that, over the last decade, the social networking giant illegally acquired competitors in a predatory manner and cut services to smaller threats – depriving users from the benefits of competition and reducing privacy protections and services along the way – all in an effort to boost its bottom line through increased advertising revenue.”

The Verge reported that this lawsuit centers on Facebook’s acquisitions, particularly its $1 billion purchase of Instagram in 2011. In addition to its acquisition strategy, the attorneys general allege that Facebook used the power and reach of its platform to stifle user growth for competing services. The Verge also reported that the FTC case cites Facebook’s decision to block Vine’s friend-finding feature after the Twitter acquisition as a particularly flagrant instance of this behavior.

To me, it seems like Facebook could potentially face some legal consequences as a result of one – or both – of these lawsuits. It will be interesting to see what would happen if Facebook is required to seperate itself from Instagram and WhatsApp. If Facebook is required to improve user privacy, I think many people would want to know the specific details about how it will do that.