Tag Archives: Flash

Google Puts One More Nail Into Flash’s Coffin



Chrome logoAdobe Flash may be dying the slowest death of any software platform that’s ever existed. And it’s about to move even closer to its demise, based on a recent announcement from Google. The search engine and internet services giant has announced that it will stop Flash from loading by default for most websites in its popular Google Chrome web browser.

Google won’t be completely removing or blocking Flash in Chrome. The new default state for the browser will keep Flash from automatically running when a website tries to load a Flash-based player. Instead, Chrome will force websites properly configured with HTML5 players to load those players first. Users will be able to configure the browser to use Flash first if they really want to. Some sites, such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitch, and Amazon will still have Flash enabled by default. But that exemption will only last for one year.

The tech community at large has been watching the slow decline of Flash popularity for about a decade now. In its heyday, Flash was used for everything from in-browser video games and online applications to web-based audio and video players. But when Apple launched its first iPhone, the company was adamant that the device would never, ever support Flash natively. This decision may have led to quicker and wider adoption of HTML5, a web standard that made it easier to deliver rich content thru the internet.

Flash is often derided for its many security issues and its need for constant updates. This move by Google will surely put another nail into Flash’s coffin. I doubt anyone will really be disappointed.


One More Reason to Get Rid of Flash



Usage of Adobe Flash on the internet has been on the decline for sometime now and most users view that as a good thing.  Flash, while being a great technology, has proven problematic over the years.  There have been countless security vulnerabilities, endless updates from Adobe, and many fake versions that have compromised unsuspecting users.  Now, the folks over at HTTP Archive have added one more reason to the growing list of why Flash is bad.

They recently conducted a study of the response, or download, time for some prominent web site features including Flash, Javascript, HTML, CSS, and several different image formats.  The results probably aren’t really that surprising in the sense that most of us already knew that Flash could be slow and cumbersome.  However, just how much slower than virtually all of the other web technologies, may come as a bit of a shock.  Flash is almost 4 times slower than the second slowest technology, JPEG.  The chart they published, which can be seen below, shows the “average response size” in kilobits (kb).

Flash was once the darling of the internet, but it has slowly been replaced by newer, more efficient, technologies that can bring dynamic content to web sites with much better performance.

object response size

Source: HTTP Archive is a site that analyzes thousands of web pages each month to get these types of statistics.


GNC-2011-11-10 #720 No Aliens?



Well no video tonight, I failed to hit record :( Enjoy the Audio :) Lots of great tech content, I am wrapping up a great week here in the Nations Capitol. Headed back to Honolulu which is hosting APEC so that should be fun.. Thanks for listening.

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GNC-2011-10-20 #715 Seven Year Anniversary!



This show is pretty close to the seven year anniversary of the show. It has been a great run, and I want to thank all of you for being loyal fans.. You will get a chuckle at the beginning of the show as I for some reason have no idea what day it is.. Lot’s of tech and thanks for all of the emailed comments.

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Adobe BrowserLab 1.6.4



Given the people who read this blog, as well as write for it, I doubt I am a minority when I say I have, and use, multiple web browsers on my computers.  At any given time you can find Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Chrome on my PC’s.  I haven’t yet succumbed to adding Safari or Opera, or any of the lesser-known flavors, but I am a regular on the big three.

Web developers are a whole different story.  They need to check and verify everything they do in every browser that has any type of user-base.  Not to mentions other applications like Flash.  There is an easier way than installing and updating all of these, though.

Today Adobe announced the latest version of BrowserLab – 1.6.4.  BrowserLab allows you to test web sites and web apps within the application against all of the major browsers, plus Flash.  The latest version of BrowserLab adds support for the following applications.

  • Chrome 14 was added (Windows), and Chrome 11 was removed
  • Firefox 7 was added (Mac OS X and Windows), and Firefox 4 was removed
  • Safari was updated to 5.1 (Mac OS X)
  • Flash Player was updated to 10.3.183.10 (Mac OS X and Windows)

They keep it up-to-date, but it’s generally a bit behind browser releases.  Plus, they are promising Flash 11 (already available) in the next version.  Still, it’s much easier than trying to manage all of this yourself.  If you develop apps and don’t know about this yet, then you will want to head over to Adobe BrowserLab to check it out.


Adobe to End Support for Flash and Acrobat 8



One thing about Adobe products is that changes come quickly.  Unfortunately, that’s due, in large part, to their ever-present security vulnerabilities.  Of course, Flash and Acrobat are the targets because of their overwhelming market share.  Hackers always gravitate to where the most potential victims are.  Adobe, for their part, has become pretty good at getting out the updates to try and stay one step ahead of trouble.  Since they pop up notifications about updates most users probably stay pretty close to current, but there are always stragglers and procrastinators.

If you aren’t keeping track, we are currently at Flash version 11 and Acrobat version X.  And, just a little while ago, Adobe announced that they will be ending support for Flash and Acrobat versions 8.  Adobe released a technote about it explaining the end-of-support process and what you can expect, but an Adobe rep summed it up with the simple “Upgrade… as quickly as possible.”

Adobe provides five years of product support, starting from the general availability date of Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat. In line with this policy, support for Adobe Reader 8.x and Adobe Acrobat 8.x will end on November 3 2011.

End of Support means that Adobe no longer provides technical support or distributes runtimes. This policy affects product and security updates for all derivatives of a product or product version (localized versions, minor upgrades, operating systems, dot and double-dot releases, and connector products.)

As noted above, support will end on November 3rd, which is now less than a month away.  Most people should already have upgraded, and hopefully kept up with security updates, but if you haven’t then go do so now.  If you would like more information, you can read the entire technote.


Preview: Adobe Edge Creates HTML5, Javascript, CSS3



Adobe Edge
Adobe Edge

This morning, Adobe released Edge – a preview version of their new software to create HTML5, Javascript and CSS3 scripts. If you have used Adobe Flash to create web content before, then the switch to Edge will be straightforward. With the similar interface, the switch over to HTML5 might just be an easy transition for some.

The Preview version is (of course) not a full version. There is no mention when the program will be released. This is a pretty easy to use program to save you time in making banners and custom scripts.

Adobe Edge Interface
Adobe Edge Interface

Upon first opening, I watched some of the tutorials and script examples – including a banner with a ferris wheel and roller coaster running. I then got into the meat and potatoes by creating my own banner.

The timeline is where you can take your text, images and other items into the program and make adjustments. Resize, fade in and out, move, rotate, and more. Move the cursor in the timeline to adjust the item for your script.

Since it’s a preview version, there are some things you cannot do yet. Importing video, making buttons or hotspots, or converting Flash scripts to Edge are some examples. Still, if you want to make a simple banner to spruce up a website, Edge preview is available to work from.

This is pretty impressive for what it is. I definitely want more from this program and cannot wait to try more features from this program. It could even replace Flash altogether – which would end the debate for iOS users in getting content.