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Tag: Web

GoDaddy first to launch new vanity domains

Posted by Alan at 3:54 PM on November 8, 2013
GoDaddy logo

GoDaddy logo

ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, has been opening the playing field recently, allowing for more top-level domain names. The days of the simple .com, .net. info and the rest are becoming a thing of the past. Replacing, well complimenting, then is a whole new breed that opens the floodgates to your wildest imagination.

At the forefront of this new wave is GoDaddy who today announced “today begins a new chapter in the expansion of the Internet, with the introduction of new Internet domain names.  GoDaddy, the world’s largest domain name registrar, is the first registrar to sell pre-registrations on the new, ICANN-approved domain name extensions, as part of a new program designed to expand the inventory of Internet website addresses”.

What’s included in this big update? According to the company, customers can now get ” .UNO, .MENU, .BUILD and .LUXURY, and more than 700 additional domain names are expected to launch over the next 24 months”.

There are some things to be considered before jumping feet first into this fire — “Each of the new domain extensions launching today for pre-registration have unique attributes. .UNO is a place online dedicated to Spanish speakers. .MENU gives restaurants a relevant name for their businesses. Contractors, designers, builders and more can use .BUILD. Those looking to appeal to a more affluent clientele, .LUXURY is available”.

Prices and exact rollout plans were not announced as part of this news,

GNC-2011-12-22 #731 Happy Holidays

Posted by geeknews at 1:19 AM on December 23, 2011

I talk about the GoDaddy SOPA controversy in detail. I have a lot of fun on today’s show, and for those watching the video of the show I try out some new camera angles. We still need to raise about $2500.00 to meet our fund raising goals for our Support Staff. I hope you will help us out see the links at the bottom of the page.

Note: I am hiring 4 writers email me geeknews@gmail.com

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The Web Perception Trap

Posted by tomwiles at 12:35 AM on May 8, 2011

We seem to be moving into the age of the apps. Are apps just a passing fad, or is something more substantial afoot?

We have come to think of the Internet itself as being synonymous with the World Wide Web. However, that’s a wrong perception that may have many of us caught in a perception trap making it difficult for us to “get” what is happening.

The Internet itself is a platform on which to run applications, a fact we would do well to remember. In the early days before the Web, there were data moving applications such as Gopher, IRCP, Telnet, etc. along with many others. HTTP just happened to be one of the major protocols that in combination with other protocols gave foundation to the websites we are all now familiar with. The Web itself is not the end of the story, but just a data delivery application.

Though we don’t think of it this way, many websites themselves are really applications.

The apps that seem to be taking over our smartphones and have given rise to tablet computing are more than what they appear to be. Though today the best of these apps seem to be giving concentrated bits and pieces of the full-blown functionality of websites, I believe a larger fundamental trend is going on than we currently realize.

The apps themselves are in the process of evolving into new Internet applications and will ultimately give rise to new services that go beyond computers and browsers. One day in the future, apps may well eclipse the Web as the data delivery applications of choice. Applications follow the form of the devices on which they are executed.

Apps are just now beginning to invade televisions. We are still in the earliest stages, and things are still clunky. Moving beyond the clunky stage, imagine what form these new web-based TV apps might look like in the future. Forget about browsers, and forget about existing web services that run inside them. For example, think in terms of a networked app running just on a connected TV – what could be done with that? Would it be possible to create an app that just delivered a live IPTV network stream (or a bunch of them)? Of course it would, and it would be an advantage over having to scroll through clunky, often near-useless lists and near-worthless descriptions because that’s the way websites running on computers seem to work best.

It could be argued that connected gaming consoles are data delivery apps, delivering specialized services to the end user that go well beyond browser-based or browser-conceived functionality. The Microsoft Kinnect attached to a connected X-Box with end-users using their bodies to interact with the games and ultimately other Kinnect users is moving data back and forth that has nothing to do with the Web.

Ultimately we must begin to think about the Internet as a global data retrieval/delivery system that is independent of computers and browsers. Computers and browsers are just one application of potentially thousands, hundreds of thousands or even millions that have yet to be thought of. Therefore, apps must conform to the devices, machines, or appliances they are running on. App designers would do well to forget about computers and browsers and begin thinking outside the computer/browser Web perception trap.

Smashing Desktop Wallpapers

Posted by Andrew at 1:00 AM on October 8, 2010

Smashing Magazine is a website aimed squarely at graphic and web-site designers but there’s some great resources there for all geeks.

First up, is a series of absolutely gorgeous desktop backgrounds for each month of the year.  October’s were released at the beginning of the month (unsurprisingly) and they’ve taken them a step further with the inclusion of a calendar on the backgrounds.  There’s plenty to choose from in each set – there’s 45-odd in October’s.

Secondly, I know Todd’s a great font fan and there’s an article here with 30 high-quality free fonts (some licensing restrictions apply.  The article in itself is a work of art as it shows you what the fonts look like.  Most of the fonts are text but there are a couple of specialised ones, such as the clothing care symbols.  I look at the fonts and the designs and just want to be creative.

Top 25 Coding Errors

Posted by Andrew at 8:41 AM on February 19, 2010

The Mitre Corp has produced the 2010 CWE / SANS Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors which identifies the most commonly encountered coding errors that can potentially lead to web sites being hacked or PCs being compromised.  Some of the errors are well-publicised in the technical press, e.g. “cross-site scripting”; some are downright stupid, e.g. “use of hard-coded credentials” and others are the results of carelessness, e.g. “improper validation of array index”.

However, what makes this document better than the usual Top-X lists is that it provides guidance to programmers on how to prevent or mitigate the errors.  For example, to avoid cross-site scripting it suggests, “Use languages, libraries or frameworks that make it easier to generate properly encoded output.  Examples include Microsoft’s Anti-XSS library, the OWASP ESAPI encoding module and Apache Wicket“. There’s additional information for the technically-minded that goes through the different stages of software development starting with initial design, through to compilation, implementation and testing.

One of the best pieces of advice is in the discussion around checking for unusual or exceptional conditions, “Murphy’s Law says that anything that can go wrong, will go wrong. Yet it’s human nature to always believe that bad things could never happen, at least not to you. Security-wise, it pays to be cynical. If you always expect the worst, then you’ll be better prepared for attackers who seek to inflict their worst. By definition, they’re trying to use your software in ways you don’t want.”

So, if you are into web programming in any way, this has to be mandatory reading to keep the bad guys at bay.  Even if you are not, the discussion elements for each of the errors is illuminating in showing exactly what is going wrong and why it’s bad.  Just skip over the technical bits in between.

The Onion strikes…. Again.

Posted by J Powers at 8:07 AM on September 6, 2009

The origins of the Onion newspaper come from my hometown. In fact, I worked with a few of the staffers at other local University newspapers. I did do a couple “Satire” articles for the Onion, but nothing was published.

Apparently, the Onion has a great reach – even to those who don’t understand. Another article was re-published as actual news. This time it was a Bangladesh newspaper – The Daily Manab Zamin – which then was picked up by the New Nation.

The articles talked about a (supposed) news story that Neil Armstrong was quoted “the Moon landings were fake…” The two news agencies soon after learning the Onion is a satirical paper, apologized for the misinformation.You can read the Onion article here

This is not the first time the Onion has influenced another writer. in 2004, the Beijing News first didn’t site the Onion until pressured. The news article was about how Congress won’t resume until a new “Modern” capitol was built. So not only did they use misinformation, they plagiarized it.

It’s interesting how the web can spread a hoax. There was another, also in 2004, where a man beheaded himself on a video. It was posted to see how fast the video could be made into news. An Arab station picked it up and the wheels were set in motion.

As for the Onion, please understand it is not a real news source. It is satire. If I remember correctly, there was only one issue that actually reported real news. But that was years ago and no one remembers it.

Plex

Posted by KL Tech Muse at 10:11 AM on June 30, 2009

Do you have a Mac and would you like to be able to watch, view and listen to all your media in one place, then Plex maybe the application for you.    Plex can be downloaded at  www.plexapp.com it is for Intel Leopard only.  Once you have downloaded and installed it, you will probably want to add those video, audio and image files that you already have burned to you internal or external hard drive. You do this by mapping the drive to Plex. It is fairly easy once you have the files label correctly and there is a tutorial to help you through the process.   Once the videos are added Plex will go out to IMdb and pick up all the data on the movie including cover art, synopsis, and even short clips.  If you add music from the Itunes library it will also pick up the information from Grace notes.

Websites Available

The next thing you want to do is go into the Application store.  There you will see all the Internet sites that you can add.  This list grows all the time as more sites are being added,  Food network is a recent addition to the list.   The Application store is divided into various section including new applications, where you can find any new web sites that have been added.   It also divides it into categories like music, video and photos.   Most of these are free to use, however some like MLB or Netflix you do have to have an subscription.  Others like BBC I.tv are available only in there country of origin unless you use a proxy.   Once you have your preferred applications installed, they are ready to be used immediately.

When Plex is working it is a great application, however it does have some problems.  When you add your movies and Plex goes out to IMDB to get the information, it doesn’t always get it right.  For example, I added the movie  The Haunting (orginal 1960′s version) which Imdb picked up as a Haunting in Conneticut.  You can go in and correct it manually.  It does help to have the video labeled correctly before you have Plex scan for them.  The tutorial will tell you how to do that.
The second problem is that if for some reason your hard drive gets disconnected, when you reconnect it sometimes Plex loses the movie information and you have to rescan it again.  The third problem is that on occasion when you go to play a video from a Web site, nothing happens.  I mean you click the Web site like Hulu and the system just sits there.  Most of the time if you shut Plex down and restart it, that will solve the problem.   However sometimes that doesn’t work, usually you can find the solution on the forums.  The system does work better if you are connected to the router by Ethernet instead of wirelessly.  The main short coming with Plex is that it is requires you to watch it on a computer monitor and is not set up to watch on TV.   Also if you are in to sharing with your friends, there is no way to do that through Plex.  Due to these problems, I don’t think Plex is quite ready for the main stream, however it is constantly improving and definitely going in the right direction.

Blogged with the Flock Browser

Military Internet for Battle Management

Posted by geeknews at 9:18 AM on November 14, 2004

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is developing its own, private, computer network and web, a la the Internet and World Wide Web. The new computer network web, called the Global Information Grid (GIG) will provide military commanders a “God’s-eye view” of the battle. The GIG will enable real-time digital communication and data dissemination through a familiar technology, similar to the World Wide Web, anytime and anyplace, under any conditions, with requisite security.

Amplifying the GIG’s capabilities is the initiative the DoD’s communications transformation is Global Information Grid Bandwidth Expansion (GIG-BE). According to the Defense Information Systems Agency website, the GIG-BE will create a ubiquitous bandwidth-available environment to improve national security intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and command and control information-sharing. To implement GIG-BE, The program will provide increased bandwidth and diverse physical access to approximately 100 critical sites in the continental United States and in the Pacific and European theaters. These locations will be interconnected via an expanded GIG core. Specifically, GIG-BE will connect key intelligence, command, and operational locations with high bandwidth capability over physically diverse routes, and the vast majority of these locations will be connected by a state-of-the-art optical mesh network design.

Dave’s Opinion
I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that the U.S. government would be designing its own secure, stable, and reliable web. What surprised me, once I started researching this topic, is how much detailed data is available on the public web. Maybe I should come out from under my shell more often.

Call for Comments
What do you think? Leave your comments on the message center.

References
Defense Acquisition Guidebook (GIG description)
Global Information Grid Bandwidth Expansion
Message Center