App.net an Alternative to Twitter

App.net is a Twitter replacement which is based on a subscription. I joined 5 days ago. The cost is $36.00 which is a drop of about 25 percent from the originally $50.00 for the subscription. There is also a $5.00 monthly subscription available. Under App.net you own all your content If you decide to cancel your service you have 60 days to export your data. App.net has promise to make that exporting easy. They promise not to sell you personal data to advertisers or any other third-party.

Unlike Twitter, App.Net actively encourages developers to create third-party apps. Based on users feedback, App.net will distribute $20,000 among developers monthly. Right now there are over 30 mobile apps alone. Most are iOs based, there are some Android apps also and at this point only 1 mobile Window app. I expect more Windows mobile apps to be created once Windows 8 mobile comes out. There is a listing of all the available third-party apps for the various platforms listed on the App.net website. Personally on my Mac I am trying bothWedge and Appetizer. On the iPad I am currently using AppNet Rhino however Netbot by the same people who make Tweetbot just came out and it is also very popular. On my Android phone I am trying Robin which is invite only beta.

Why join app.net

1. There are no ads.
2. It is a place where you can have great conversations.
3. At this point it is mostly celebrity free.
4. So far no annoying hashtag trends.
5. There is 256 character limitation instead of the Twitter’s normal 145.
6. Most third-party apps are set up to allow you to cross-post to Twitter.

The negative

1. You have to pay for the service
2. There is a small but growing membership
3. Not for someone who just wants to announce things
4. Your friends may not be on the service, so you will need to persuade them to join.

I am really enjoying App.net and if you join I am listed as klandwehr

The Google Play Store Comes to Twitter

google play twitter account

The Google Play Store, formerly known as the Android Marketplace,  has finally launched it’s own Twitter account.  It may sound like a pretty minor event, but it could actually be a fairly big deal for all of the Android device owners out there.  Many businesses today have not only taken to Twitter to answer customer questions and handle complaints, but also to run promotions.

The latter is exactly how Google plans to use their new @Googleplay handle.  According to Alex Dumitru over at Android Geeks the Mountain View company “will begin tweeting special promotions, updates and exclusive contents through its official Twitter live channel.”

The Play Store account already has over 28,000 followers, despite having posted only two tweets, and no deals, so far.  It”s actually a bit surprising that it took Google this long to set up something that the Amazon App Store had from day one.  Regardless, it’s better late to the party than never.

Shell’s “Let’s Go” Campaign – Brought to You by Greenpeace

The other day, a good friend of mine retweeted something that was originally posted by Social Media Team @ShellisPrepared. It caught my attention for two reasons. One, this friend doesn’t make a habit of retweeting a lot of things. Two, the original tweet implied that Shell Oil had been the victim of a social media attack.

I went to the Twitter profile of @ShellisPrepared to learn more. Things didn’t look good. Every single tweet mentioned something about “subversive” or “inappropriate” ads that they were trying desperately to remove. My immediate thought was: “Somebody at Shell doesn’t know how to properly use social media”. I would never have known about the ads that they wanted to take down if it wasn’t for them tweeting about it. Wouldn’t it have been smarter to quietly shut down the website, remove the offensive ads, and keep it quiet?

Naturally, I was curious about just what those ads were. The @ShellisPrepared profile contained a link to their new campaign, which appeared to be called “Arctic Ready”. I rushed over to their website. hoping to get a glimpse of the ads before they shut down the website that contained them.

What I saw was a train-wreck of a marketing campaign. There was an easy to use “ad generator” on this page. Anyone who wanted to could choose from one of several photos: swimming polar bears, an arctic fox, a bird with some baby birds, a floating iceberg, and more. Next, you could type in a slogan. The phrase “Let’s Go.” would be automatically added. The best ones would be placed on billboards. This was basically a way to “crowd source” some ideas for their ads.

It was immediately apparent that no one at Shell was reviewing the ads that people created before they went “live” onto the website. Every single ad was negative. Slogans like “Birds are like sponges … for oil!” and “Some say catastrophe, we say opportunity” were generated. Nothing here was positive. People either really hate Shell Oil, or emphatically don’t want oil companies to drill in the Arctic.

Other ads pointed out how badly Shell failed at using social media. Slogans like “We still haven’t noticed we are being trolled”, and “The ad generator is not down for maintenance” and “This is the biggest marketing fail in the history of failing” appeared. The internet has a plethora of trolls, and many of them found their way to the ad generator. Shell got picked on for “not knowing how to internet”, so to speak.

I scrolled through several pages of these ads, laughing all the way. Then, I thought, “Wait a minute! How am I still able to access these ads if Shell is frantically trying to take them down?” It turned out that there was a very good reason for this. The website isn’t run by Shell Oil. It was created by Greenpeace. The entire purpose was to create a user generated attack against Shell Oil.

To me, the most fascinating part of this entire hoax was that no one questioned it. People didn’t question the idea that a company like Shell Oil would be inept enough to set up an ad generator, that anyone could use, and then fail to monitor the contents that people created. Nobody questioned the sight of a big company failing with their use of Twitter.

Goodbye, Apple Ping in iTunes. I Hardly even Used Ya

ping2

Apple announced their social network Ping would be removed in the next version of iTunes. It didn’t build the excitement as Apple wanted it to. Because of the integration of Facebook with iOS6, and also integration with Twitter, Apple decided to retire the network.

Ping was announced on September 2nd, and saw 1 million users in the first 48 hours. After that, it didn’t see the growth it wanted. Of course, it didn’t help to be behind the walled iTunes garden.

Ping

Will Facebook Replace Ping in iTunes?

Since the announcement that Facebook will become integrated in iOS6, it makes one wonder if Ping will get replaced with Facebook or Twitter. That way, you still have a social network in iTunes.

ping3

With a social network in iTunes, you can have people publicly announce what they are watching and listening to. It’s technically free advertisement to say “Hey! Buy from iTunes, because your friend Joe did!”. So it only goes to see the integration happen. Either that, or turn iTunes into web-based software.

According to All Things D, Ping will be removed in the next major revision – coming out this Fall. In the meantime, when you download something from the iTunes, store, just choose the drop-down and share on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Why Cable TV Subscribers Are Making It Miserable To Cut The Cord

This is what I look like waiting for TV shows to be released on Netflix. Not really – this is what I look like all the time. Image Credit – BigStock

There’s a new report out this week (to be filed in the “Duh” folder…right next to “No Kidding”) showing that some 2.6 million cable television subscribers cancelled their service in favor of Internet-based streaming services between 2008 and 2011.

Reported by Slashdot, Yahoo and others this morning, Canadian research firm Convergence Consulting Group summarized the following from their…well, research:

“We estimate 112,000 TV subscribers were added in 2011, down from 272,000 in 2010, and forecast 185,000 TV sub additions for 2012. 2000-2009 annual TV sub additions averaged 2 million. Based on our TV Cord Cutting Model (takes into account economic conditions, annual subscriber additions, digital transition), we estimate 2.65 million (2.6%) US TV subscribers cut their TV subscriptions 2008-11 to rely solely on Online, Netflix, OTA, etc, 1.05 million (1%) in 2011 alone. We forecast cord cutters will reach 3.58 million year end (3.6%) 2012.”

So, essentially, folks are fleeing traditional television for streaming services in decent numbers, but those numbers seem to be slowing. News reports on this are rounding up the typical line-up of culprits for this dialing-back on the rush to streaming – content limitations of streaming services (a.k.a. ‘ I can’t believe Netflix doesn’t have so-and-so) based on sluggish deals being struck by Netflix and others with studios and networks; and the ultimate price-tag of achieving a more robust catalogue of content will break the cost model for places like Netflix and their service will become prohibitively expensive. [Read more…]

What Social Media Really Deserves

Shitter Toilet RollHere at GNC, we pride ourselves on the quality and integrity of our writing, but for one article only, it’s going to go down the pan….literally.

Much of the Internet is full of crap and Twitter is responsible for its fair share. Put the two together and you get Shitter, toilet paper printed with a Twitter feed of your choice. No, really.

It’s a bit pricey to clean up your number twos at $35 for four bog rolls but imagine the satisfaction you’ll get from wiping your arse with the musings of some Z-list celebrity. Alternatively you could view it as a post-modern critique of the “me” culture.

Perhaps “sheeting” will catch on as the verb of the year – remember you heard it here first!

GNC-2012-01-27 #737 Shame on Hawaii Legislature!

Going to be implementing some Studio upgrades in the next couple of weeks should be fun. I go after a couple of my state legislatures pretty hard tonight on two idiotic bills that they introduced. Also hope I was not to punchy on the last show notes. I am feeling much better by the way and although the voice is not a 100% I feel a 100% better.

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GNC-2011-12-22 #731 Happy Holidays

I talk about the GoDaddy SOPA controversy in detail. I have a lot of fun on today’s show, and for those watching the video of the show I try out some new camera angles. We still need to raise about $2500.00 to meet our fund raising goals for our Support Staff. I hope you will help us out see the links at the bottom of the page.

Note: I am hiring 4 writers email me geeknews@gmail.com

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Klout or Kred? Find Your True Influential Online Score

Kred Score

Kred Score

If you’re like me, you might have been frustrated with how Klout is scoring your online presence. It seems like score nose-dives for no reason. However, there is a new program on the block in Kred.

What is Kred / Klout?

Just like Klout, Kred is an influence scoring system. It measures how much reach you get on Twitter. If you post, it notes it; if you get re-tweeted, it notes that.

Your Kred can be broken down. On the graphic to this post, you see my global Kred. However, I can choose the drop-down and find out what my Kred is for Social Media, tech, podcasters, and other keywords.

Kred is in beta and only connects to Twitter at this time. It looks like they will be adding LinkedIn and Facebook soon. Klout, on the other hand measures to those three plus Google +, Foursquare, YouTube, and a host of other sites (if you participate on them).

How Kred Measures Score

From the Kred Blog:

Kred gives Influence Points every time there is an exchange that indicates someone inspired another person to take action: replying to them, mentioning them in a post, retweeting their content, or following them or their list.

Kred assigns 10 points for the most common actions like being @replied, retweeted or mentioned in a conversation. More points are given for events that have bigger impact, like having a message retweeted by someone with more than 10,000 followers.

Klout Perks

From time to time, Klout offers perks like gift certificates, gifts, and invitations to closed betas (like when Google Plus was in beta). You can check the Klout perks to find out what you can participate in.

Why Should We Measure Kred / Klout Score?

You might think it’s vein to check your score, but it’s no different than a marketing company checking production on their sales or work. Once you know what your reach is, you can work on improving it. For instance, I have high marks in podcasting, but lower marks in Social Media. I can now focus on building that area.

Kred states it’s the “Nielsons of online”. If people can find your influential in an area, they may just call you up to give you work. For those of us who work for ourselves, getting jobs handed to us sounds like a very delightful thought.

It’s a good idea to see what people recognize you as. If you want to break into a specific field, you want to follow those who are leading. You might even become a leader yourself. Just like a good marketing department follows sales through a third-party company, you can do the same with these two programs.