Tag Archives: RSS

Feedly Introduces Boards, Notes, Highlights



RSS aggregation service Feedly has been working hard to expand its service offerings to make it more of a valuable tool to businesses and power users. Feedly recently entered the next phase of its development with the release of its new Boards, Notes, and Highlights features:

Whatever your motivation, the power of information lies in your ability to harness it. Today we are sharing three new features we hope will make your Feedly experience even better: Boards, notes, and highlights.

As you save more stories, your Boards become libraries of the most important stories you find on Feedly. Everyone can create new Personal Boards. Feedly Teams users will see separate lists in the left navigation for Personal and Team Boards.

Feedly goes on to describe this new feature as:

  • Boards: For saving and organizing stories. All Feedly plans (Basic, Pro, and Teams) can save stories. When it comes to naming your Boards, try to keep a singular focus. This will keep you organized by your specific projects, clients, brands you monitor, or other important tasks.
  • Notes/Highlights: Feedly Pro and Teams users can enrich stories using notes and highlights. If you are part of a Feedly Teams plan, your teammates will be able to read your notes and add their own. Highlight the most important passages to make it easy for your colleagues and other executives to scan through stories. Since stories saved to Boards never expire, you’ll be able to revisit these notes and highlights in the future.

Some of these new tools from Feedly are available to users of Feedly’s free-service plan. More features become available with Feedly’s different paid-service plans. For more information, click the link at the top of this article.


Dave Winer Releases Electric River RSS Aggregator



Electric RiverDave Winer recently announced the release of the Electric River desktop RSS aggregator for Mac. Electric River was created within the Electron programming language and it uses elements from the open source River5 project.

The Electric River app is a friendly RSS aggregator currently available as a downloadable Mac app (Winer hopes Linux and Windows versions of Electric River will be released soon). More on Electric River from Winer’s blog:

There’s a lot of power in there — it is the full unmodified River5 from the GitHub site. When you lift the hood there’s your Lists folder, Data folder, Rivers folder, all the pieces are there, and all the generality. While we have a UI for editing one list, you can have as many lists as you like.

There will also be a new release of River5 coming with this, with the addition of three new callbacks that allow us to do things a bit more efficiently because the reading and configuring app is running in the same process as the server.

I approached this project once before, a couple of years ago, but I didn’t have enough experience with Electron, Node and JavaScript to trust the result. Now I am reasonably confident that this will work.

I downloaded and tested Electric River on my iMac. The app comes preloaded with a selection of news sources, including NPR, New York Times, Laughing Squid, and more. The user interface (see image above) is dead simple to use, with immediately recognizable controls for adding and removing feeds.

Clicking the Docs tab at the top of the Electric River interface provides quick access to the files that come with the download, for those who want to manipulate the contents of their RSS aggregation at a more advanced level.

Electric River for Mac is available as a free download.


New InoReader brings full functionality RSS to mobile



rss logoWhen Google discontinued Reader it left fans of RSS in a rough spot. Fortunately there were many options to choose from, and new ones sprung up to take advantage of the situation. One service that you may have switched to is InoReader, a popular choice among the big names in the field. The service is more or less continuously updating its offerings, both web-based and mobile.

This time around it’s the mobile version that is getting a makeover. “Today we’re launching the new Inoreader web version for mobile phones – a much richer and better looking successor of our old mobile web version. Now you have the full Inoreader platform with all the content and functionality straight in your pocket”.

The company boasts a more friendly design, better access to menus (they claim to have made this more logical), better, and more mobile-friendly, article viewing and a new dashboard. “If you’re used to starting your Inoreader experience from your dashboard, you can now do that on mobile, too. You can even change your dashboard on the go – just tap the plus button to add gadgets or the gear icons of each section to update it”.

The new version is available now and compatible with all mobile devices. InoReader is free, though there is a premium model for those who require more features.

2015.03.18 Blogpost Mobile Website


InoReader gets big update with “Bundles”



InoReader

In the time since Google decided to kill off its Reader app, RSS fans have been searching for alternatives. While many landed on Feedly, it is far from the only alternative. Users can choose from options such as The Old Reader, Feedspot and several others. Those who chose InoReader will be getting a new update today, bringing what seems to be a nice new feature.

Bundles aims to bring sharing and easy discovery to users. Sharing has always been possible, but this improves things. “With bundles you can show your favorite sources for everyone to discover. You can share the most helpful blogs on the Internet or the best sources for photography/cooking/design/insert-hobby-here”, the company announces.

Creating a bundle is also fairly easy. Simply head to the Preferences menu and click the new Bundles option the give it a name and customize it with a picture of your choice. Now you can add the feeds you wish to include.

It’s a nice and very simple system. InoReader makes almost continuous updates to its platform. In fact, you can expect updates about once a week, or at least that is how it has been so far.


BeyondPod gets a major update, comes to Chromecast



Earlier this week we learned of a major update to Chromecast, bringing support for ten new apps to the little Google HDMI stick. Now those updates are trickling out to the included services, with support hitting Android podcast app BeyondPod today. This update may feature Chromecast support, but there is more than just that included.

Users will also receive better support for devices running Android 4.4 (KitKat),  an easier way to play the audio portion of video feeds — just use Menu > More > Play Videos as Audio, support for Portuguese and Brazilian translations, improved episode handling and numerous bug fixes.

beyondpod-menu

BeyondPod is free from the Google Play store, though there is a premium version, as well. There is also a separate app that is designed to support 7 and 10 inch tablets. Now you can ‘cast’ the GeekNewsCentral podcast right to your TV, as well as taking it with you on your travels.


Get faster subscriptions with Add to Feedly for Chrome



feedly logoWith the death of Google Reader earlier this year, many net denizens were left scrambling for an alternative — and issuing a few choice words to Google upon departure. While countless (exaggeration) alternatives exised, most would up landing on Feedly. In fact, the service did an admirable job scrambling to add bandwidth and servers to face the influx head-on.

While the app does a decent job, there are certainly still complaints to be made about its shortcomings — lack of alphabetical order that results in a chaotic looking feed is mine.

Though that one has not been fixed by Feedly, extension or user script, other tweaks can be made. For instance, how about the ability to add a feed right from the site you are on and without even knowing the RSS address? That is what “Add to Feedly” can do, providing you are using the Chrome web browser.

The extension places an icon in your menu bar that, when clicked from any site, will automatically determine the RSS feed associated with a website and offer you an option to add it to your Feedly subscriptions.

This is one option that helps to soften the Google Reader blow just a bit, by adding a feature that we did not previously have access to in that old RSS program.


Reader is dead, Google points out alternatives



Google Reader
Google Reader

At the end of yesterday, July 1, the bell tolled for Google Reader. While it was a sad moment, many alternatives exist.Granted, most of us wish we did not have to move to them, but that is the grim future we must all face.

A brief visit to the web site displays a dire message that customers have been dreading for sometime — the search giant informs its loyal followers that “Google Reader has been discontinued. We want to thank all our loyal fans. We understand you may not agree with this decision, but we hope you’ll come to love these alternatives as much as you loved Reader”.

The company then goes on to link to alternative services. Feedly tops the list, though The Old Reader, Newsblur and many other make the list of approved apps. Some, such as Flipboard and Feed Demon are listed, but failed so far to get the Google Seal of Approval.

Google also attempts to avoid confrontation by posting the answers to questions it anticipates will be asked:

————-

1. What will happen to my Google Reader data?
 
All Google Reader subscription data (eg. lists of people that you follow, items you have starred, notes you have created, etc.) will be systematically deleted from Google servers. You can download a copy of your Google Reader data via Google Takeout until 12PM PST July 15, 2013.
2. Will there be any way to retrieve my subscription data from Google in the future?
No — all subscription data will be permanently, and irrevocably deleted. Google will not be able to recover any Google Reader subscription data for any user after July 15, 2013.
3. Why was Google Reader discontinued?
Please refer to our blog post for more information.
———-
It seemed to me unlikely that Google would go through with cutting this cord, given the internet-wide outcry, but Reader is gone and users have little choice but to grab their data now

Reeder Won’t be Ready on July 1st



Reeder logoThe clock is ticking! Google Reader will die on July 1, 2013. If you are still using it, you have very little time left to find an alternative RSS reader. You can find a lot of suggestions, all across the internet, about which of the remaining RSS readers you might consider switching to.

Those of you that were planning on using Reeder are in for some disappointment. It has been announced that Reeder is not going to be ready on July 1, 2013. Instead, the development of Reeder will continue after that date.

There are currently 3 versions of Reeder. None of them will be getting major updates.

Reeder for iPhone (version 3.2) is currently being offered for free. It will support Feedbin, Feedly, and Fever. It will also support Feed Wranger (but has no support for smart streams in Reeder – yet). It will also allow you to use standalone or local RSS without syncing.

Reeder for Mac and iPad will not be updated. They will both be removed from the App Store on July 1, 2013, because they still require Google Reader in order to function. Don’t expect to see these apps return until after they have been modified to work without using Google Reader.


Feedly taking full advantage of Google’s stupidity



feedly logoWhile all of us will lose thanks to Google’s inexplicable decision last week to shut down a service which seems to have been much more popular than the search giant would have you believe, one company is certainly not unhappy about the move. Feedly has been in a whirlwind since that announcement.

Within hours of the Google announcement Feedly had already posted detailed instructions on how disenfranchised users could export their RSS feeds from Reader and import them into the Feedly service.

Now the company has announced that it has received an influx of more than 500,000 new users in the first 48 hours after the Google announcement. “More than 500,000 Google Reader users have joined the feedly community over the last 48 hours. We love passionate readers. Welcome on board”.

Feedly says it has added ten times its previous bandwidth to handle the load and that new servers are being brought online to help with the new found popularity. The company also plans on adding new features weekly.

Its nice to see a company that still understands the need that many of us have for a good RSS reader and wants to support the users of it, as opposed to simply ignoring its customers as Google has shown it is willing to do. Feedly is available for iOS, Android, Chrome, Firefox and Safari.