Geek News: Latest Technology, Product Reviews, Gadgets and Tech Podcast News for Geeks


Tag: Protection

Liquipel: Protect Your Device From Water

Posted by KL Tech Muse at 8:14 AM on February 28, 2013

Liquipel Liquipel is a nano technology that is applied to devices to act as a liquid repellant. It treats both the inside and outside of the device. This is done without having to take the device apart. Liquipel is applied at the shop and it bonds at a molecular level. The nano coating is 1,000x thinner than a human hair. Since the application is done without having to disassemble the device the warranty is not effected.

The Liquipel newest product is Liquipel 2.0 which was developed to help repeal salt water. Salt water even in the air can corrode a device over time. Many people who live near the ocean in places like Florida were asking for something that would help repeal salt water and Liquipel came up with Liquipel 2.0.

At this time all the work has to be done in shop, so you have to send the device in. They are working on a 4x4x4 unit that can go into retail locations, so the user doesn’t have to ship the device out. It is $59.95 to treat a phone and $89.95 for a tablet. If it fits into the machine they can treat it.

Interview by Jeffrey Powers of Geekazine, and by Nick DiMeo of F5 Live.

Support our coverage sponsors:
32% off your new order @ GoDaddy: go32off1
$1.00 / mo WordPress Hosting with a free domain! Promo Code: press4
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain! Promo Code: geeks12
GoDaddy Promo Codes always save you money, check out my Promo Codes Today

PlayPlay

G Form Extreme Gadget Protection

Posted by Andrew at 12:15 AM on January 22, 2012

G-Form Logo

G-Form is best know for its protective gear for high adrenaline sports but using this know-how, it’s protecting something much more precious – your expensive tablet with its Extreme range of cases. If you think this is gimmick, these guys dropped an iPad in an Extreme Portfolio from a weather balloon at 100,000+ feet….and it survived.

Todd talks to Rick Garrard to find out more about the high altitude drop and gets a demonstration of what happens when an 8 lb bowling ball lands on a packet of chocolate M&Ms covered with G-Form’s Extreme protection. Mmm, chocolate.

The Extreme cases and sleeves are on-sale now from $34.95 upwards for the iPad and Kindle Fire (or 10″ and 7″ tablets).

Interview by Todd Cochrane of Geek News Central for the TechPodcast Network.

Support our coverage sponsors:
32% off your new order @ GoDaddy: go32off1
$1.00 / mo WordPress Hosting with a free domain! Promo Code: press4
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain! Promo Code: geeks12
GoDaddy Promo Codes always save you money, check out my Promo Codes Today

PlayPlay

Taser C2 Personal Protection Device

Posted by tomwiles at 2:41 PM on February 9, 2011

Carissa O’Brien interviews Doug from Taser and demonstrates the use of the Taser C2. We tried talking Carissa into getting tazzed but she was not up for it this year.

The Taser C2 packages start at $379 and up.

Interview by Carissa O’Brien of Geek News Central.

Please Support our CES 2011 Sponsors.

Save 25% on 4GH Hosting 1yr Subscriptions Save 25% Promo Code CES2.

Wear Your Email Safety Helmet

Posted by GNC at 7:15 AM on October 6, 2009

Whenever I want to feel fearful and depressed I usually visit one of the news websites. Earthquakes, murder, war, theft, snoops, kidnappers, recession, depression, corruption, and all other sorts of horrible news. When I read the news sites I’m reminded of how unsafe the world is. Soon I tire of the bad news and move on to investigate the net for news on tech and design. Today Foxnews.com had the audacity to remind me that I am unsafe even on the web. The site highlighted the news from Microsoft that thousands of Hotmail passwords had been exposed. It scared me to death. I nearly jumped to my Hotmail account before I even finished the article. Reading on I discovered that Microsoft had deactivated all the affected accounts until true control could be restored. Why do I care? Hotmail only collects my spam from sites that demand an email address. Hotmail lets through all the other spam anyway! But I digress.

email icon The point of all this is: we are never safe. Their is no safe haven in the world or the web.  Every company does it’s best and so must we.  Yet, sometimes problems may come. If we live with that understanding we can truly do our best to protect ourselves. When we react in panic there is not a clear path of thinking. So with this reminder of our web-identities fragility, what should we do? Let’s refresh four basic email and online account rules:

  1. Always use a secure password. Your birthday, name spelled backwards, address, mothers name, dog’s name, middle name, favorite food, and initials hardly qualify. Use one of the many free random password generators on the web or if you insist on an easier to remember one then create a mixture of information that you can remember. For example and purely fictitious: !S1eP99t9 This could be a combination of the month and year you and your spouse were married. Now while I would only call this a basic password it sure beats “Fluffy”. Of course if you want your bank account to be protected by Fluffy, then more power to you.
  2. Never use the same passwords for multiple accounts. For that matter don’t do what I did at the start and use the same password with just the last letter different! Why would you want someone to have a free-for-all with all your accounts? Use different passwords and find an open-source or free password vault. I personally love 1Password for the Mac.
  3. Change your passwords periodically. I must admit it takes the misfortune of someone to remind me to do this.
  4. Don’t use a public computer. Many public computers are not adequately protected against the installation of malicious password key logging applications. Just don’t log in on a public computer. Just say no. And certainly don’t buy something online with your credit card information! Browse the web on it, read the news, just don’t give any information.

I understand these are basic tips, but sometimes we just need to be reminded to stay alert and on guard.  Kind of like reminding our kids to wear their helmet when they ride a bike.  Resist the urge to become lazy online. I don’t want to read about you on Foxnews.com.

Lost Hard Drive Contains 23,000 Social Security Numbers

Posted by geeknews at 1:32 PM on September 5, 2004

Students, faculty, and staff at seven campuses of the California State University (CSU) system are at risk for identity theft after a hardware technician improperly disposed of a computer hard drive with unencrypted database tables that included Social Security numbers and other personal details. The CSU is required, under California law, to notify all affected parties.

The law, which went into effect last year, requires notification whenever personal data, such as Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers or credit card numbers (with identification numbers) have been accessed without authority.

The university system’s hard drive has been missing since Friday, June 25th. The technician left the drive laying on a worktable after upgrading the computer from which it came. In a rush to start the weekend, the drive wasn’t properly secured, and come Monday, there was no sign of it. The drive was most likely picked up by the evening cleaning crew; however, the results of a police investigation was inconclusive.

Dave’s Opinion
Hard disks, like portable media, must be completely destroyed before being discarded. Using a security data deletion (wiping ) program such one that comes with the PGP data security program, would have prevented the data being recovered, even if the drive were reused.

Call for Comments
What do you think? Leave your comments below.

Ink Cartridge Manufacturers Get Legal Go Ahead

Posted by geeknews at 12:40 PM on October 30, 2003

The U.S. Copyright Office ruled this week that a manufacturer of low-cost, third-party printer ink cartridges can continue to make and sell cartridges for Lexmark printers. This ruling will have broad impact on the printer consumable market as alternative brands of ink cartridges may now move from the black market to retail store shelves.

Lexmark International sued Static Control Components (SCC) for copyright infringement of computer code contained in Lexmark’s printer ink cartridges, charging SCC with violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) ban on circumventing digital technology that protects copyrighted material. SCC had reverse engineered Lexmark’s software and created it’s own brand of ink cartridges for Lexmark’s printers.

Dave’s Opinion
The Copyright Office took an tack, rather than considering whether SCC had violated Lexmark’s intellectual property protection, the office ruled that the DMCA does not restrict SCC’s actions. This means that software developers may not be free to reverse engineer code if the intention is to create interoperability with another’s computer application.

With this ruling in hand, I expect that there will be a flood of third-party ink cartridges for both Lexmark and Epson printers, the two manufacturers who are most frequently faulted for imbedding chips in their ink cartridges and forcing users to buy the more expensive primary brand consumables.

Call for Comments
What do you think? Leave your comments below.

References
U.S. Copyright Office Ruling (the interesting details start on page 172)
Lexmark International
Static Control Components
Epson