GNC-2011-04-04 #660 Media on Demand Launch

I share with you tonight our upcoming Media on Demand / PPV offering that we will introduce at NAB. Very excited about this new product offering and making it available to all of the content creators we work with and the new genres we will be expanding into. If you are going to be in Vegas at NAB stop in and see the team at the show. I have an action packed tech show for you as well.

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Show Notes:
Can Engadget keep it’s Mojo?
Engadget Hail Marry?
Bonus for Oil Safety (YGTBFKM)
Cablevision 300 channel iPad App!
D-Link Wireless Camera
Sprint Tap and Go Payments.
Bionic Eye.
100gb Media Disk.
Rdio Review.
Sony New Headphones.
WordPress Themes.
Windows 8 Screenshots.
MLB Subscription Work Around.
YumTable
Managing your Reputation.
Packing your Suitcase.
Automating Facebook Postings.
Windows 8 + Built in = PDF Reader = Winner!
Not in my Coffee!
* Cool Spatula!!
Do we really need this?
Love Watch – Hate Price.
Cydia gets Advertiser.
NY State RFID Drivers License.
Russians Off to ISS.
Not my back yard.
Shuttle Launch Delay.
Google Crisis Team Overview.
FCC smacks North Carolina Legislature.
Chemical THC.
P2P Rulings Everywhere no consensus.
8mp Camera iPhone 5?
Data Caps around the World.
Appleseed Program by Apple.
Major e-mail hack rundown.
Fed Appeal court gets first P2P damages appeal.
Woz and Normal People use Tablets.
Financial Times says No Way to Apple.
App Stores Data Run Down.
Library with no Books.
Baldness Cure?
More math for High Schoolers?
Harvard Business Review on MPAA and RIAA.
COICA support declines.
Copyright Infringement Tested.
Senators who stopped Whistle Blower Bill.
EU appoints IFPI Reps to set EU Copyright Rules.
Instacast Podcast Player.
,ly sites in trouble?
Mozilla goes after slow plugins and apps.

PlayPlay

McAffee: .cm Top Level Domains are the Worst

mcaffeeMcAffee put out their annual “Mapping the Mal Web” report. It is a PDF that lets you know how risky a website in a Top Level Domain (TLD) can be. Since the .com is so widely used, it’s easy to say it’s on the top of the list. But it’s not #1 – that dubious honor is left to Camroon – the .cm domain.

I always said that TLD’s in other countries are not the best way to go for a domain. Generic TLDs are controlled by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). These include .com, .net, .edu, .org, .biz and a host of others. This is because an individual company that holds a TLD could fold at any time and the TLD with it.

Take the case of .md – It was a TLD held by an independant company from 1995 – 2003. On May 20th, 2003, the IANA was informed that the parent company – dot MD, LLC – fell under chapter 11 bankruptcy. The TLD was in flux for a while, but eventually became sponsored (which is all you can ever do for a TLD) by MoldData.

In the case of .md, health care or those in Moldova, would use this TLD. If this was a TLD that really didn’t work for a country or a profession (let’s say .qq), it would have most likely been disbanded unless a new sponsor was found. Also, unless you were a doctor or one of 3.5 million residents of the country, this TLD would show small risk for malware.

The top 3 on McAffee’s list – .CM, .COM and .CN. The 3rd is the People’s Republic of China, but what’s more interesting is the fact that if you accidentally mistype, you could easily go to google dot cm or google dot cn.

McAffee stated in their report that 5.8% of all domains showed risk. Up from last years’ 4.1%. Seven of the twenty riskiest TLDs were in the Asia – Pacific region. .CM came in with a risk level of 36.7%, .com was at 32.2% , .cn was 23.4% and .info was at 15.8%.

On a good note, Hong Kong dropped from the top 10 in 2008 to 34th place. Therefore, some TLDs are doing a lot to make their areas of the web a little safer. Congrats .hk.

On the other end of the spectrum, .gov (Government), .jp (Japan), .edu (Education), .ie (Ireland) and .hr (Croatia) are the least risky. It makes perfect sense with .gov and .edu – because you need to be in government or education to have the TLD. However, Japan, Ireland and Croatia were a surprise – especially since with Ireland you can easily make words out of the TLD, like Carr.ie, bird.ie, coll.ie, yupp.ie and microsoft.ie (could point to MS’s Internet Explorer website).

McAffee checked sites on each TLD for Viruses, spyware and what they call “Potentially unwanted programs (PUPs). Overall, malware downloads decreased slightly in this last year. 2009 showed a 4.5% risk of downloads as opposed to 4.7% in 2008. Romania (.ro) topped the charts with 21% risk. .info had 17.2% risk for email malware.

Still, out of 27 million domains, only 5.8% had risk to them. It’s still up from 4.1% of 2007 and 2008, but McAffee did mention they changed their methodology to the report to show the 5.8%. They also mentioned that there are still “Hidden risks” out there that McAffee is determined to find.

So before you buy your next domain, check out the .pdf. It’s a pretty informative document on not only which top level domains are risky, but who your giving your money to. Did you know that .ly is the ccTLD (country code Top Level Domain) for Lybia? Did you also know that if you buy a .ly that you are helping the sponsor – General Post and Telecomunications Company?

Not to say it’s a bad thing, but it’s definitely something to think about.

PDF for Everyone

There was a time, back in the technological dark ages, just a scant two or three years ago, that PDF’s could only be created by Adobe Professional. It was so fancy, so rare, and so expensive that it didn’t even need a real name, just “Adobe Professional.” To differentiate from other Adobe products, we often called it Adobe Acrobat Professional, just to denote it was different than the free Acrobat reader we all needed on our computers.

But the tide shifted when Adobe lost their tight control on the PDF production framework. Now anyone can make a PDF, for free, any time, using software that is usually already installed or easily installed as a plug-in to existing products. Microsoft Office has a save-to-PDF plugin, and so does Open Office. And now, Firefox does too. Self-publishing websites now have their own proprietary and functional PDF converters for use by authors, and if all else fails and you can find nothing else,you can go out and download a free PDF creator like PDF 995, or PDF Converter from SourceForge. Many of these freebies now come with all the bells and whistles of Adobe Acrobat Professional, including style sheets, text-to-audio creation functionality, and complete creation tools.

I played a bit today with the Firefox plugin, which is made by Nitro, and it is adequate for the task. It is easy to save off a PDF of a website, links intact, for use in presentations or just to save for archival purposes. My complaint would be it doesn’t allow me to change any settings, and it is a bit slow to create the page. The output is really good, though, so it’s not a bad tool at all.

There is no reason for anyone not to be able to produce a PDF these days, whether or not they have Adobe Acrobat Professional.