Medfolio Pill Organizer

Medfolio Do you have a relative or love one who is on a lot of medication that they are constantly forgetting to take. Perhaps you have trouble keeping track of your own medicine. If these cases sound familiar to you then you may be interested in the new Pill box by Medfolio. Julie Fulmer-Mason a pharmacist is the creator of the pill-box by Medfolio.

This is an old fashion pill-box brought into the twenty-first century. The pill-box comes with a CD which the user down loads to their computer. They connect the box to the computer by USB. They then enter the medicine they are taking, how often they are supposed to take it, how many days they are to take it for and what time of day they should take it into the easy to use software. Then they put the pills in the proper box. This can be either set up by the user or often their pharmacist will set it up for them.

Once it is set up then when it is a time to take a pill the box will send out both an audio and visual reminder. The actual compartment where the correct pill is will also light up. The user can remove a compartment and take it with them and still get a reminder by either text or email. The user can print out a chart of the pills they are taking and place that chart on the pill-box lid along with sample pills. The patient can take the box along with them to the doctor, that way both the patient and the doctor will know exactly what medicine the patient is on. There is also a  cloud service available which can be used to keep track of things remotely. Great for families with elderly parents who live far away.

The basic pill-box is $248 and the WiFi version with cloud service is $298.00. There is an $8.00 monthly service fee for the text and email reminders.  The Medfolio Pill Organizer is available through Medfolio,  Amazon, QVC and Buy.com

Interview by Chris Montera of Health Tech Weekly

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TEDxBelfast 2012

TEDxBelfastAt TEDxBelfast last night I was inspired by the stories of individuals who passionately believed in an idea and then made that idea a reality. From working with autistic children to building a new arts centre, these people all made a difference. Presented in Titanic Belfast in front of the replica of the famous staircase, it was an unforgettable evening.

Titanic Staircase

As with all TED conferences, the presentations will be posted on-line but that will take a week or two before they are ready. In  the meantime, these are the speakers, their stories and how they made a difference.

David Maxwell of Tyrone Timberframes presented his work with Habitat for Humanity in building highly energy-efficient homes that have no central heating. The significant cost of fossil fuel-based energy can be a big factor in poverty and these homes can save the inhabitants over £1000 per year.

Maureen Murphy, Director of Aurion Learning, grabbed attention with the headline that 70% of training was wasted and proposed an innovative way of providing effective training using the acronym ASSAULT. One of the best bits was that of story-based approach that hooked the learner and got them more emotionally involved.

Fransuer Makula grew up in the slums of Kenya but is now a teacher in a prestigious school in Northern Ireland. Describing the harsh reality of existence as a street child, where death is commonplace, he related how the children dared to dream big. In the midst of utter poverty, these children wanted to grow up as doctors, nurses and lawyers. Fransuer established “Jengana” to help orphans, street children and schools in West Kenya.

Colleen Hardwick, billed as an urban geographer and serial entrepreneur from Vancouver, laid out the loss of personal engagement in democracy. The statistics she presented on the fall of voter turnout over the past few decades were shocking. To counteract the anonymous global nature of the web, she’s developed PlaceSpeak, a community-based website that lets local people be authenticated as stakeholders in local issues without necessarily giving up that anonymity.

Next was an absolute gem…acoustic guitar duo Declan McKerr and Andy Toman, aka Gypsy’s Wish, serenaded TEDxBelfast, equipped with a brand-new George Lowden guitar. His guitars are world-famous with owners such as Eric Clapton and Mike Oldfield. Sublime.

Following a musical theme, Chris Blake, Principal Horn with the Ulster Orchestra, talked about the work he’d done with autistic children and the therapeutic value of music. The results were truly ground-breaking, increasing the evidence between autism and musicality.

Dr Nigel Hart took us all on a trip to the peaks and Mt Everest in particular in his talk on Mountains, Medicine and Mantras. Clearly a keen mountaineer, he combined his medical training with his passion to investigate the effects of hypoxia on humans at altitude. During his climb to the top of the world, he had to rescue another climber who had collapsed. Apt for many shared endeavours, his response to the famous climbing question was not, “Because it’s there” but rather, “It’s not the height or the distance, it’s the people you travel with.”

Anne McReynolds, CEO of the Belfast Metropolitan Arts Centre, had TEDxBelfast captivated by her struggle to get a world-class arts centre built in Belfast. Starting in 1996 and finally opening in 2012, it’s an amazing story of architects and artists (“good clients get good buildings”), buildings and space. If you want to build an arts centre, Anne should be the first person you talk to.

Colin Williams of Sixteen South tackled the “Can’t Do” attitude that has often afflicted Northern Ireland with a great story of “Can Do” success. It’s likely that you’ll never have heard of Sixteen South, a children’s TV production company but if you have kids under five you’ll have heard of Sesame Tree, Big City Park, Pajanimals, and Big & Small. Working with the BBC and The Jim Henson Company, Sixteen South produces these great TV programmes here in Northern Ireland. Fantastic.
Colin’s business plan was pretty clever too. “Do some good, make some money, have some fun.” Good advice for anyone.

Chris Horn completed the speaker line-up with his inspiration for Dublin’s Science Gallery, an exhibition space that takes a creative and artistic approach to the presentation of science and related issues. By taking the traditional remit of a science museum and combining it with the changing presentation of an art gallery, the Science Gallery is an innovation in itself that has proved tremendously successful. So much so that Google recently awarded the Science Gallery $1m to setup other Galleries around the world.

Overall, it was a great evening, with inspirational speakers in a fantastic setting. Thanks also to Davy Sims and Gary Burnett and Mark Finlay for organising #TEDxBelfast.

Robotic Hair Restoration – Your Head on an Assembly Line.

ARTAS

ARTAS

Hair. Long Flowing hair. Unless you lose it on top, then you go to a company that will put hair back on top of your head. You love the idea so much, you end up buying the company.

Now there are robots that help transplant hair. Recently, the FDA approved robotic hair transplant technology. These Restoration Robotics – Also called ARTAS - make the art of Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) a lot easier for the physician.

Sara Wasserbauer M.D. has performed a two-year study, collecting data on the effectiveness of the ARTAS. She has found shorter healing times, less invasive surgery and a cut in transplant time – 5 hours as opposed to 10 without the robot.

“It’s quite amazing to think how far technology has come,” said Dr. Wasserbauer. “The use of robotics is already used in many fields of medicine – especially in surgical procedures. I’ve been very excited about this particular study and am enjoying being part of the research team to determine the pros and cons of using robotics in hair restoration.”

The device looks pretty scary, but it looks to advance the technology of hair restoration. The physician uses software to help guide the robot in placing the hair.

I personally chose the opposite – I can grow a full head of hair, but would rather not. However, I know that some of you want to reverse your baldness and don’t want to have a bad experience. With this robot cutting down the out-patient process and possibly creating a more successful hair restoration process, would you prefer this system over regular hair restoration?

Change the Future

The Science Museum, London, is celebrating a century of science and as part of the festivities, it asked visitors to vote for the scientific discovery or invention that most “changed the future”.  The ten objects it put forward were:

1. Apollo 10 Capsule
2. DNA Double Helix
3. Electric Telegraph
4. Model T Ford
5. Penicillin
6. Pilot ACE Computer
7. Steam Engine
8. Stephenson’s Rocket
9. V2 Rocket Engine
10. X-ray Machine

And the winner was……the X-ray Machine, beating penicillin and the DNA double helix into 2nd and 3rd place respectively.  The discovery of X-rays in 1895 by Wilhelm Roentgen started a new era of medical diagnosis allowing medics to see inside living people without relying on surgery.  Today, the descendants of these first X-ray machines can almost measure what we think.

Amazingly, the particular X-ray machine shown was developed at home in under a year by Russell Reynolds while he was still at school.  He was assisted by his father, a general practitioner, and another inventor William Crookes.

Although some doctors were quick to pick up on the new invention it wasn’t until the 1920s that X-ray machines were widely used in medicine.

Making The Modern World is a complementary web site containing over a hundred scientific discoveries which helped shape civilisation.  Worth a browse.

What inventions today will have such an impact when we look back from 2109?