GNC-2010-08-02 #598 Additional Stream on Justin.TV

Yes you heard me correctly 100 Terabytes if you think that is crazy wait till we ad some more devices to the mix, never in my wildest dreams would I have thought we would move that much video traffic in a month. Tonight, I introduce a second stream, we are on both Ustream.tv and Justin.TV see links below, will work the bugs out over next few shows.

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Insider / Ohana Links:
Future Fuel: Using food crop residues (as opposed to food).
Great review of an app that streams video to iPhones/iPads
Google Apps Implementation in LA.

The Geek’s Show Links:
Abuse of New Media Creators!
Kindle with Microphone?
Overpaying for iPad Data Plans!
FaceTime over 3G.
Sensors to correct blurred Images.
100 Million dollar Cyber Army.
Heat Water with Water.
Are you a woodworker?
Office 2011 for Mac Pricing.
Facebook doubles Data Center Size.
Samsung Captivate.
Where do you spend your time online?
Android Overtakes iPhone Sales!
Clearwire race to 4G
IE regains ground!
Should we Green Card the Brightest?
Time-Warner Wideband Blasted.
Ustream Turns over User Data.
Wired and the Web is Dead?
Data Collection on you and I.
Botnet has treasure trove!
RFID Sniffing.
Is the Rover Spirit Finished?
NASA cash on Hold!
NYC Subway Cell Covergae soon!
Verizon Lobbyist Expenditures.
LHC to re-write Science.
Trillian 5 Beta.
Google Maps to catch Permit Cheats!
Fridge Dock for your iPad.
Get Videos at your Local Library.
Solar Tsunami Today!
200 Billion on counterfeit Goods?
Go To Jail #1
Needs to go to Jail #2
Is your Browser HTML5 Ready?
Rock, Paper, Scissors.
No E-Book Allowed.

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Amazon Kindle E-Books

Shortly after getting my HTC Evo phone, one of the initial apps I downloaded from the Android Marketplace was the Amazon Kindle app with the idea I’d probably check it out at some point. Weeks went by, and I pretty much ignored the app.

Yesterday I was talking to a good friend that is in the process of formatting e-books for an author friend of his, including formatting the books in the Kindle format. During the course of our conversation, I mentioned to him once again that I needed check the Android Kindle app out. He pointed out that there were free e-books available in the Kindle format on the Amazon website, including many books from 1922 and before that were now in the public domain, so after I finished his call I went on Amazon.Com with my computer and started digging around in the Kindle Store area of Amazon. Sure enough, there seemed to be plenty of free e-books available, so I started adding them. To get the Kindle app on my phone to synch with my Amazon account couldn’t be easier, I simply entered in my email address and Amazon password into the app. Any books in my Amazon storage area are quickly updated to the app.

Sure, some of the free books weren’t exactly my taste, but I was able to open them on my phone and finally see how well the Kindle app worked. Hummm, not bad – not bad at all. To make a long story short, I ended up finding a current book I really liked and purchased it for $9.99.

What a pleasant surprise I was in for. Reading a Kindle book on my HTC Evo is actually a good experience. The text is quite legible. The surprising part is that twice now I’ve carried the phone with me into restaurants and was able to easily read using the phone while eating. Of course, the HTC Evo has a handy built-in kick stand that allows the phone to sit on its side at an angle. I can eat and then periodically lightly touch the right side of the screen in order to make the Kindle app advance to the next page. The Kindle app even synchs the latest page I’m on back to the server, so if I open the book up again either on my phone or on my laptop, it opens up right at the exact page where I stopped reading.

At this point I have no plans on buying an actual Kindle, however I suspect I will be buying more Kindle e-books in the future. I often carry my phone around with me wherever I go, and because of the way the Kindle app works across all Kindle apps associated with my account, I have instant access to every Kindle e-book in my Amazon account storage area on every associated Kindle installation. There are often times I end up having to cool my heels waiting on something, and it’s incredibly handy to be able to use that otherwise often wasted waiting time reading. Ten minutes here and twenty minutes there really do add up over time.

All of this talk about, “Oh, the iPad has killed the Kindle” is bogus. Amazon has been very smart to put Kindle apps out for as wide a variety of devices as possible. Even if they don’t sell that many Kindle readers, the Kindle format e-book is a huge Amazon win, both for Amazon and for consumers like me.

Does The Cloud Have A Dark Side?

Does The Cloud Have A Dark Side?For some time we’ve been hearing about the virtues of cloud-based computing.

Certain functions seem to lend themselves to the cloud. Online word processing, spreadsheets, etc. can seem to make sense in some situations, such as collaborating with others.

In everyday use scenarios, does the cloud really make sense in more traditional private computer-use situations? I contend that it does not.

Right now I’m typing this into Microsoft Word on my MacBook Pro. At the moment I have rather lousy Sprint and Verizon connectivity, even though 12 hours ago at this very same location I had really good connectivity from both. The only thing that changed is the time of day. If I was currently limited to using Google Docs chances are I would be unable to write this. Network demand constantly fluctuates depending on the time of day and location.

Is there enough bandwidth available? With the tsunami of smartphones that are on the immediate horizon, will the carriers be able to keep up with the average five-fold bandwidth demand increase that the average smartphone user pulls from the network? Can carriers keep up with a smartphone-saturated public all trying to pull down data at the same time?

However, for the sake of argument let’s say that mobile Internet connectivity isn’t an issue.

What if the Internet is turned off due to a declared cyber attack and all of your documents are online? What good would the network appliance approach to computing be then?

Can e-books be revised after the fact? If government can simply decide to turn off the Internet, then it’s not that much of a leap to imagine laws and regulations being passed banning certain types of blogs or even books that have been deemed dangerous or seditious. There have already been books sold such as “1984” by Amazon that were deleted from Kindles after the fact by Amazon when it was determined that Amazon didn’t have the legal right to sell it in e-book form. What if instead of banning books, they were simply rewritten to remove the offending parts? What’s to stop instant revision of e-books that have been declared dangerous?