Lightworks by EditShare

lightworks-monitor-gui-new2EditShare is introducing the Mac version of Lightworks. Lightworks is a cross–platform film editing software. Lightworks has been used by some of the best film makers over the past two decades. It now works seamlessly on Mac OS X.  Film makers who love their Mac’s, will now have the option of using it for their film editing. EditShare will be showing off the Mac version at NAB and will be starting the new alpha program in the near future.

EditShare is also releasing the full version of the new Lightworks version 11.1 for Windows on April 30, 2013. The Linux version has successfully completed the Alpha program of version 11.1 and will begin the public beta on April 30, 2013.

EditShare is already working on Lightworks version 11.2 which will add:

  • Added support for AJA I/O hardware
  • Support for screen capture using the record panel
  • An improved import panel: now behaves similarly to bins, mark/park clips before import
  • Native H.264 MOV playback
  • Added curve effect to FX color correction effects

If you are or want to be a film maker you owe it to yourself to take a look at Lightworks, by EditShare. If you are at NAB they will be at booth SL9010 showing off the new Mac version of Lightworks.

V-Studio looks to enhance your video recording

iStudioV-Studio, short for “virtual studio”, is a new setup from Darim that is designed for those looking to record professional style video for a podcast or YouTube show.

Camera angles and zooming can be easily controlled and a whiteboard can be inserted onto the screen as it is being recorded. The V-Studio comes in both consumer and professional versions. The Pro version packs in even more features, enabling the user to create a studio on a par with stations like CNN.

Pro:

  • Instant create and manipulate a unique virtual in real time!
  • Virtual studio production means a lot more than just mixing and switching videos.
  • Gain full control over production.
  • The world first Hybrid Camera Tracking System.

You can find out more at iStudio 3D. A word of warning though — this technology comes at a price.

Interview by Andy McCaskey of SDR News and RV News Net

Support our Show Sponsor:
30% off your new order @ GoDaddy:
gnc30
1.49 .com New or Renewal geek149
$1.00 / mo WordPress Hosting with a free domain! Promo Code: press4
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain! Promo Code: geeks12
GoDaddy Promo Codes always save you money, check out my Promo Codes Today

Play

Blackmagic Cinema Camera

Blackmagic Cinema Camera The Blackmagic Cinema Camera is one of those cameras, that makes me wish I was a cinematographer. If when you think of a video camera, you think of a bulky device that sits on your shoulder then you need to take a look at the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, What makes the Blackmagic Cinema Camera special is what they concentrate on. When video cameras are being sold many times they are sold based on how many megapixels they have. More megapixels just create a larger image, it does nothing to improve the quality. The Blackmagic Cinema Camera focuses on capturing a wide contrast range rather than more megapixels. This allows them to capture more detail at the black and white level. The ability to capture a wide contrast range plus the EF and ZF lenses produces a high quality video that looks like film. Being able to capture at a wide contrast range is great but if the data is compressed it will still produce an inferior result. To solve this problem the Blackmagic Cinema Camera has an integrated SSD recorder which allows you to record full 2.5k raw sensor data completely uncompressed CinemaDNG files. It also allows you to record at DNxHD or ProRes for HD resolution files that are compatible with Avid Media Composer and Apple Final Cut Pro X.

There is a standard auto jack which allows you connect a microphone and record high quality audio uncompressed. To add metadata you simply tap on the LCD screen and add it like you would on a smart phone. The metadata is saved and is available as a file in Final Cut Pro X and DaVinci Resolve Format. You can also change many of the camera setting by the LCD touch screen.

I could tell you about the specs all day, but sometimes seeing is believing and this maybe one of those cases. John Brawley an award-winning photographer was able to get a hold of a Blackmagic Cinema Camera for testing and he put up some videos on his site showing off it’s capabilities. It is a handheld and made of blocked aluminum. Making it perfect for a professional trying to produce high quality videos. These Blackmagic Cinema Camera will run about $2995 and ship in July.

NAB Coverage Sponsored by GoDaddy.com Save 25% on a 4gh Hosting Account Use Code NAB.

Panasonic and LiveU Announce Further Collaboration

LiveUIn today’s connected world where many people and organization want to stream their video live. One of the problems that must be dealt with is trying to watch how the transmission is running plus maintaining the quality of the streaming video, while still shooting the video. This requires at least two people, something that small operations cannot afford. This is the problem that LiveU and Panasonic is trying to solve with the announcement to cooperate on using LU40I video uplink and the AJ-HPX600 P2 camcorder. The LU40I video uplink will integrate with the camcorder’s interface. It will give the camera operator a real-time look at the transmission and video quality. The camera operator can manage video uplink while continuing to shoot. Allowing a one man crew to transmit high quality live videos over the Internet.

Michael Bergeron, Business Development Manager for Panasonic System Communications Company of North America (PSCNA) “When the operation of the LU40i is integrated with the camera, the complete system provides a high-quality video feed with the easiest remote operation yet.”

This is a continuation of the cooperation between LiveU and Panasonic which began at IBC in Amsterdam last September. Where they agreed to collaborate on HD 3D live mobile broadcast over cellular networks.

Samuel Wasserman, LiveU’s CEO, said, “We’re thrilled that Panasonic, a world-leading camera developer and manufacturer, has partnered with LiveU to develop this next-generation camera uplink solution using our cellular-based technology. We are confident that ‘live cameras’ symbolize the future for broadcasting and online media, and will open up new market segments for live video transmission around the world.”

Further details are expected when the AJ-HPXL600 launches.

NAB Coverage Sponsored by GoDaddy.com Save 25% on a 4gh Hosting Account Use Code NAB.

Miro 4.0

Miro just came out with version 4.0. and its a clear hit. If you believe in supporting open source application, you have to try Miro. Miro is a open-source music and video player. It has been around since 2005 and was originally known as the Democracy Player. It is a part of The Participatory Culture Foundation a nonprofit foundation. You can use it download, watch, and listen to video and audio podcast. You can also add sites such as YouTube and Ustream and watch them within Miro. It is available for the Mac, Windows, and Linux.

With the newest update to Miro 4 it has become even better. The ability to buy mp3 and applications directly from the Amazon or the Google store within Miro has been added. Music stored in your Amazon Cloud Player can also be played within Miro. You can also add your iTunes music and movie library to Miro. Adding these libraries to Miro has no effect on ITunes, Miro simply points to the appropriate folders. If you have an Android device you can convert and sync music and applications to these device from Miro. I can see Miro being use with any Android device as iTunes is used with iOS devices. You can play almost any video format within Miro including HD video.  You can also use Miro to convert videos into mp4/h264 formats which are playable on most portable devices. If you have Miro installed on multiple computers within the same network you can now stream and transfer media between these computers. YouTorrent is built right into Miro and is really fast. You also have access to media that is available from ClearBits which provides hosting and distribution for open license media.  These are just some of the features that are available within Miro.

When upgrading from Miro 3.5 to Miro 4 I did run into a problem, when I added my ITunes library. It imported the library itself rather quickly, however it did take awhile to import the metadata. In fact it froze up a couple of times, if you have a slower machine like mine (Mac Mini 1.66 Ghz Intel Core Duo) I would recommend deleting the application and then downloading Miro 4. This seemed to fix the problem. Before you do this make sure you export your podcasts as an opml file, so they are easy to add back in. I have been using Miro since before it was Miro and I have always liked it, and it gets better with each version.

 

Flixwagon Mobile Video Broadcast and Social Networking Platform

Arie Offner and Roy Ginat present Flixwagon (http://www.flixwagon.com/), a mobile video broadcast and social networking platform. The product is aimed at business and corporate users. Verizon will be soon launching the Flixwagon Android application for selected Verizon Android phones.

Interview by Esbjorn Larsen of MrNetCast.com and Jeffrey Powers of Geekazine.Com.

Please Support our CES 2011 Sponsors.

Save 25% on 4GH Hosting 1yr Subscriptions Save 25% Promo Code CES2.

[flowplayer src='http://blip.tv/file/get/Techpodcasts-CES2011LiveFlixwagon361.m4v' width=480 height=270 splash=http://www.geeknewscentral.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/flixwagon.png]

OTT Tsunami

We’ve been hearing quite a lot about Internet-delivered video content lately. Trends sometimes seem to advance slowly over a long period of time but then tumultuous market shifts seem to happen overnight.

Blockbuster just filed for bankruptcy. Blockbuster was unable to reconfigure their business structure to compete effectively with Netflix. It seems that Netflix has won the ongoing war.

Streaming video and video podcasts have been around for several years – these are not new ideas. However, what is new is the proliferation and increasing popularity of set-top boxes.

Back in the 1980’s backyard satellite TV dishes were a hobby among people that were looking for something different and as many choices as possible. That quest for choice ended up going mainstream in the form of commercial cable and satellite providers offering hundreds of channels.

Starting in 2004 people began experimenting with Internet-delivered content in the form of podcasts. I believe that podcasting happened as a direct result of broadband availability getting to a certain critical mass, combining the existing elements of RSS, MP3’s, etc. into a new form of communication. This new form of communication offered something very different along with unprecedented levels of choice.

Internet-delivered content of all kinds is rapidly becoming mainstream.

I believe 2010 is the year of the app. Apps suddenly seemed to have come out of nowhere to seeming to pop up on every device imaginable. Why the sudden popularity of apps? Desktop and laptop computers have been around for a long time, along with full-blown applications. What has really happened is that computers have now shrunk down to the point where they not only are in our pockets in the form of smartphones, but they are also showing up in HDTV sets and plenty of other devices. These devices we are running these apps on are actually quite powerful computers in their own rights.

There is now a wide variety of content that is heading for every computer-enabled screen you own, especially your HDTV.

OTT And Paid Content

OTT, short for “over-the-top-television” is an up-and-coming acronym that we are all likely going to become familiar with in the near future, provided someone doesn’t come up with a different marketing name. The concept is simple – it’s TV that comes “over the top” of traditional channels on a cable system via the Internet delivered in digital packets. It can either be live streaming video, on-demand streaming video, or in the form of a pre-recorded on-demand podcast.

There are many aspects of over-the-top TV that have yet to be shaken out. Specifically, here in the early stages there are some still-murky areas when it comes to details of how advertising is going to work.

Things that we know about how OTT works successfully so far:

People are willing to pay for bundled on-demand professionally created OTT content in the form of Netflix on-demand streaming of movies, TV shows, and other content. The bundled Netflix price for all-you-can-eat on-demand streaming OTT offers the consumer a real value. In most cases, a great deal of marketing money and effort has been spent promoting the majority of individual movies and other content that are available on Netflix, so the consumer has a fairly high degree of familiarity with much of the on-demand streaming content they offer. These are essentially repurposed movies that are already on the shelf.

People are willing to watch on-demand streaming OTT of professionally-created content with embedded ads as demonstrated by the ongoing success of Hulu.Com. The consumer is likely already familiar with a portion of the content, but Hulu also allows the consumer to discover and explore previously unknown TV show content in an on-demand stream with embedded ads. These are essentially repurposed TV shows, some movies, and other content.

Live streaming OTT of live content is still catching on. The most successful live OTT content as typified by what Leo Laporte and company are generating still offers an on-demand podcast version that can be downloaded later. Currently, on-demand, after-the-fact podcast versions of live OTT generated content end up with many more downloads than people watching via live streams. Both live streaming OTT and the on-demand podcast versions can contain ads. For the ads to be effective in this format, they need to be relevant to the audience’s needs and desires. The old “shotgun” advertising approach does not work in this format. This specific type of content is closely associated with word-of-mouth promotion.

There are a few questions that remain to be answered. Will consumers pay for on-demand streaming of TV drama-type content they are unfamiliar with — in other words, will consumers pay to watch an on-demand stream of a new TV show drama, documentary or reality show? Using myself as a gage, I wouldn’t pay for individual on-demand episodes of a TV show or movie I wasn’t fairly familiar with. Promotion and word-of-mouth still has to take place.

If consumers will pay-per-view for an unfamiliar on-demand TV show, can the content still contain ads? I think the answer to this depends on the content and its perceived value – i.e., how well it is promoted, and the resulting perceived value that is generated in the potential consumer.

Once “Lost” was a hit TV show, would the fanatic fans have paid for on-demand streams of new episodes? Probably they would have, if they could have gotten them, say a week or so in advance of the actual broadcasts. “Lost” fans would have also put up with ads in the advance on-demand stream. They might have grumbled about it, but if that were the only way it was available in advance, many of them would have opened-up their wallets and paid the price monetarily and with their attention to the embedded ads in order to satisfy their “Lost” habit. Clearly, the producers of “Lost” – ahem – “lost out” on a time-sensitive revenue stream opportunity.

Bottom line, I believe it all revolves around the content and the real and perceived values that the content delivers.

I liked last season’s remake of the old “V” television series. If I could be assured the production values remained just as high, I might pay to subscribe in some manner. If the “V” series is picked up again by ABC next season, I would also pay to subscribe if I could get episodes via on-demand streaming before they were broadcast.

In the meantime, we are still dealing with the death-throws of the old broadcast model with its old appointment based viewing schedule combined with the old shotgun advertising approach. ABC broadcast TV affiliates would have had a cow if “Lost” episodes had been made available as a paid on-demand OTT stream before the episodes were actually broadcast via the network.

The final destination of OTT and when it ends up at that destination depends on what is right for the time. Both delivery infrastructure capabilities and consumer demand will make that determination.

Will You Survive The Coming Changes?

Get ready for a world where everything is on demand and à la carte. Traditional broadcasting is going to change whether it wants to or not. Marketing will be forced to change in profound ways. As a result, content-making will also go through a major metamorphosis.

Marketing and traditional broadcasting have long had an interesting relationship that has had a potentially detrimental effect on the quality and quantity of available content. Television in particular has long been known as “a vast wasteland.” If one thinks about how this lowest-common-denominator programming can exist, the realization emerges that anxious, aggressive television advertisers have often been willing to sponsor junk programming content to capture passive viewers. In the pre-Internet world of broadcast TV, people would surf channels in order to find what was often the least-boring programming. Also because of the hypnotic potential of this type of TV watching, many viewers were willing to sit in front of virtually any programming without really caring about what they were watching, using TV viewing itself as a sort of nightly drug. Marketing messages get programmed into viewer’s brains, but more importantly using this type of passive TV viewing as a drug has definite detrimental side effects to both the individual, the family unit, and society at large.

After a few months of agonizing, I recently cancelled my Dish Network account. I was already a Netflix customer and was watching more stuff from Netflix than I was from Dish Network, so it has been a remarkably easy transition.

There are differences. One of the differences is that I’m now forced to choose what I want to watch when I want to watch TV. Being forced to choose necessarily forces me to choose something I find personally interesting. The net effect is I’m making a conscious choice of my television influences. Of course, another difference is that streamed Netflix content has no ads.

Hulu.Com offers streaming content with ads, and recently started offering an inexpensive monthly premium streaming content option, which also has the added benefit of vastly expanding the list of devices they will stream to beyond the desktop/laptop computer to include media extenders and cell phones. Like Craig’s List cannibalized the local newspaper ad business, Hulu.Com and similar emerging streaming services are going to further cannibalize the now-breaking and broken broadcast TV model. I say this not to blame Hulu and other services as I believe this push for choice has been well underway for a long time and these emerging streaming services are simply accelerating it.

The ad-supported content will be forced to change because the programming must be appealing-enough to consumers to get them to choose the particular content. Non-ad supported content will continue to have a market but will be forced to appeal just the same to induce consumers to choose that content.

Choosing Influences

So now that I’ve cut the cord with Dish Network, I’ve started digging deeper into the instant streaming material available on Netflix. It seems that most of the programs I would have watched on Discovery, TLC or History – the three channels I watched 99% of the time — are available as season DVD sets streaming via Netflix.

There are also plenty of season DVD’s of television programs available for streaming that I don’t have any interest in. Now that I’ve cut my Dish Network subscription, I realize that I was paying dearly for their presence even though I had no interest in watching them.

The bottom line is that I can only watch one show at a time. Having 200 plus channels available simultaneously seemed exciting, but the reality is that at least 97% of whatever was on at any given point didn’t appeal to me in any way. It’s crap looking to influence whoever it can reach out and grab.

With audio podcast listening, it allows me to choose my own influences. The IPTV revolution brings that powerful ability to choose my influences to television.

This revelation shouldn’t surprise me, because I’ve been here before. Back in late 2004 when I discovered podcasting, it was exactly what I’d been looking for. I was suddenly able to pick and choose audio content and consume it on my own terms. I could listen to exactly what I wanted, when I wanted to listen to it. Suddenly, instead of being at the mercy of having to listen to what was mostly crap programming on radio stations I happened to be driving by, I was able to turn that huge amount of listening time I had while driving into a tremendous benefit.

Broadcast television has been traditionally viewed as mindless entertainment. Like audio programming, television programming can easily be used in the same beneficial ways. Now that I’m forced to choose what to watch, I realize that what I choose to spend time watching will be much more personally beneficial.

Broadcast television is potentially detrimental and there’s no question in my mind that much of it is hypnotic. If a TV screen is present and turned on most people can’t help but periodically stare at it, even if the sound is turned down.

It has only been a bit over 24 hours since I cancelled my Dish Network subscription, and I’m already over the emotional separation. Who needs all of those less-than-useless channels?