Category Archives: medical

Azoi Kito+ Health Tracker at Gadget Show Live

kito_homepageOnly a slightly bigger than a credit card, the Azoi Kito+ is a personal health tracking device that measures ECG, heart rate (pulse), blood oxygen, skin temperature and respiration rate. I’ve seen the Kito tracker a couple of times now and every time I see it, I’m impressed that such a small device can gather so much data for so little money (GB£99). Miran from Azoi tells me more at Gadget Show Live.

The Kito+ works in conjunction with a smartphone or tablet to measure the five stats mentioned earlier. The user holds the Kito+ with both hands and two fingers from each hand rest on four measurement points for about 20 seconds, during which the time the Kito+ records the data and passes it on to the Kito app. In real-time the app shows the ECG graph trace and other figures are shown once they’ve stabilised.

Azoi Kito+

As can be seen from the picture, the Kito+ can be embedded into phone cases for the Apple iPhone 6-series of smartphone cases. It’s not essential and the Kito+ works fine outside of a case with Android or other Apple devices. The Kito+ isn’t tied to one person, so a whole family can share the unit.

The Kito+ is available now from Azoi’s webstore for GB£99, which I think is great value when you think of the technology and potential value of the data. I’ll be bringing a full review of the Azoi Kito+ to GNC in the next few weeks.

Biolight Personal Medical Devices at WTS

Biolight LogoChinese medical technology firm Biolight have developed a ranged of personal medical devices for home use, including a blood pressure monitor, blood oximeter, wireless thermometer for babies and foetal monitor. Andrew finds out more from Jeff at the Wearable Technology Show.

Biolight’s range of personal medical devices very much shows the on-going consumerisation of medical devices. These units are colourful and friendly; very different from the often austere machines of the hospital and health centre. Perhaps the most impressive thing revealed in the interview is how relatively inexpensive the products are. Obviously the prices are trade with some of the devices only a few dollars but to think that a foetal heart rate monitor costs around US$60 is incredible. It will undoubtedly sell well at three times the price. Listening to your baby before its born whenever you want? That’s a killer piece of hardware.

Biolight gadgets

SoftBattery From Enfucell Powers Medical Applications at WTS

Enfucell All of us are familiar with batteries, from the normal cylindrical cells for toys and remote controls, to the cuboid batteries often seen in digital and video comeras. Whatever the shape, batteries tend to be hard, inflexible and relatively heavy. This can make them awkward to use, especially if there’s a need to attach the battery to a person as it will need to be clipped on or placed in clothing. To address this problem, Finish firm Enfucell have developed a soft and flexible battery for use in medical applications. Andrew hears more from Anja, Enfucell’s Sales Director.

Unlike a normal alkaline battery, the thin and flexible SoftBattery is manufactured by screen printing and lamination, though in other respects it is similar using the reaction between zinc and manganese(IV) oxide (Zn/MnO2) to provide energy. Coming in both 1.5 V and 3 V versions, the SoftBattery is ideal for medical applications as the battery can be incorporated into a skin patch to measure ECG, respiration and activity while still being powerful enough to drive Bluetooth LE. As the battery is only used with one patient before disposal or recycling, there’s no risk of infection between patients.

The SoftBattery technology has been incorporated successfully into several products.

Enfucell SoftBattery

Cupris Smartphone Scopes at Wearable Tech Show

Cupris LogoThe smartphones in our pockets have cameras that could only have been dreamed of a few years ago, yet most only take a couple of selfies. So why not use these miracles of engineering to do more? Cupris‘ phone case converts the smartphone into a digital medical instrument. Helene tells Andrew more about their upcoming products.

The Cupris smartphone case mounts specialist medical lenses in front of the smartphone camera to take images and videos. The first device is an otoscope (right) for examining the eardrum and the second is an ophthalmoscope (left) for retinal imaging. The big benefit of digital imaging over the traditional scopes is that the pictures can be added to the patient record for review at a later date.

The otoscope will be available soon for less than GB£100.

Cupris Medical Imaging

Gyenno Spoon Returns Dignity to Tremor Sufferers

Gyenno SpoonHand tremors can be a very disabling condition for sufferers as the tremors affect the ability to feed oneself and simply, food won’t stay on the fork or spoon. For the afflicted, this either ends up in unremitting frustration or a considerable reliance on others. Fortunately, products are coming to the market which dampen and stabilise the cutlery (flatware) allowing those suffering from hand tremors to feed themselves with dignity. Jamie and Nick find out more about the new utensils from Kang Ren of Gyenno.

The Gyenno spoon is designed to work with a wide range of tremor conditions and the spoon uses built-in sensors and machine learning to control two independent motor systems for spoon stabilisation. In addition to keeping the spoon still, the sensors record data which can be passed to healthcare professionals to monitor the on-going condition.

The spoon is available from Amazon and is currently priced at US$312.

Jamie Davis is the host of Health Tech Weekly at He is a nurse, paramedic and health journalist. Nick DiMeo is a video producer at F5 Live: Refreshing Technology.

Become a GNC Insider today!

Support my Show Sponsor:
30% off on New GoDaddy Orders cjcgnc30
$.99 for a New or Transfered .com cjcgnc99 @
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain. Promo Code: cjcgnc1hs
$1.00 / mo Managed WordPress Hosting with free Domain. Promo Code: cjcgncwp1

SealShield Sky Sanitizes with UV at CES

SealShield Sky 7XiJamie Davies interviews Bradley Whitchurch, CEO of SealShield at CES to see how the company’s latest product keeps mobile devices clean and patients safe from infection.

The SealShield Sky uses ultraviolet light to sanitise mobile devices. Pop the tablet or smartphone in the top of the device and 30 seconds later, out it pops, bug-free and ready for use in hospitals and other medical facilities.

Available now, the 6Xi and 7Xi Sky sanitisers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and Cdiff.

Jamie Davis is the host of Health Tech Weekly at He is a nurse, paramedic and health journalist.

Become a GNC Insider Today!

Support my Show Sponsor:
30% off on New GoDaddy Orders cjcgnc30
$.99 for a New or Transfered .com cjcgnc99 @
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain. Promo Code: cjcgnc1hs
$1.00 / mo Managed WordPress Hosting with free Domain. Promo Code: cjcgncwp1

BeWell Brings Smart Thermometers And More To CES

bewell When you’re under the weather, it can be a pain to get up and go to the doctor’s office. Wouldn’t it be great if you could do a basic check-up from the comfort of your own home? BeWell Connect, a division of Visiomed, is a brand that’s dedicated to helping you do just that.

Jamie talked to Dr. Francois Teboul, Medical Director at Visiomed, about one of several new products his company debuted at CES this year– the ThermoFlash thermometer. The ThermoFlash thermometer allows you to take someone’s temperature without having to touch them and risk catching their illness yourself. Just place the thermometer over your temple and it will read your temperature and compare it with the temperature of the atmosphere around you to give an accurate reading.

The $100 connected ThermoFlash device can connect to your smartphone to give you more information and advice with the accompanying app. A non-connected version is also available for $60-70. The ThermoFlash and many other healthcare devices can be found at BeWell’s website.

Interview by Jamie Davis of Health Tech Weekly.

Become a GNC Insider Today!

Support my Show Sponsor:
30% off on New GoDaddy Orders cjcgnc30
$.99 for a New or Transfered .com cjcgnc99 @
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain. Promo Code: cjcgnc1hs
$1.00 / mo Managed WordPress Hosting with free Domain. Promo Code: cjcgncwp1

SweetBeatLife App with HealthPatch Review

sweet1Over the past 18 months I have been fascinated with the rapid explosion of health based app and devices. In the recent past I have been reviewing and testing a number of devices this week was no exception. For the past week I have been testing the SweetBeatLife App on my iPhone while wearing a HealthPatch monitor attached to my chest.

Let me start out by saying this was probably the coolest thing I have reviewed in a while. Not only were people I showed this to intrigued, I was able to get insights into my own health and stress levels.  Lets first talk about the HealhPatch. I received two HealthPatch’s as part of my review kit. As seen in the picture the HealthPatch is like a big Band Aid with sensors and electronics. inside. Once activated, the HealthPatch is paired via Bluetooth to communicate with your phone. There are simple instructions on how to attach the HealthPatch to one of three locations on your chest.

I opted to place mine in the upper portion of my left chest. For the fellows you will have to shave a section of your chest as the HealthPatch requires a smooth surface to adhere to,  so that the two probes on the skin side of the patch can make contact with your bare skin.  The instruction book says the patch should stay on for 3 days. Mine started to peel at about day 5 and I was using the Active lifestyle patch with max adhesion.

sweet2I was not particularly careful with my HealthPatch when I was in the shower, I let the water blast on it and at the same time I did not take care to shield it from soap. The HealthPatch folks were pretty slick in how they designed it to keep the electronics dry.

Once stuck to my chest the SeetBeatLife app took over.  I had to record a baseline, and I did that laying down in my living room and following the apps instructions. From then on all I had to do is turn the App on if I wanted to measure my Stress Level, Heart Rate Recovery & HRV for Training. I used the Monitor Stress the most, and tested Heart Rate Recovery several times after 20 minutes on the treadmill.  The App and monitor do much more though. You can measure with hospital-grade accuracy, your heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, calories burned, stress, steps taken and other health indicators twenty-four hours a day.

sweet3In all honesty, there where some measurements that this device made that I had to go Google to figure out. I had no clue what some of the results meant, and if the measurement was good or bad. I am not sure this app is ready for everyday regular consumer usage. But for athletes that are training for competitions, I can see where the monitoring this app can provide would be very valuable in preparing for an event.

I encourage you to preview all of the information screens that the SweetBeatLife App provides to get a handle on the incredible data sets that this app can provide. I would think that health professionals would love to have this as an inexpensive way to monitor a patients health, that he or she was concerned about without ordering a full heart study.. We have all known folks that have had to wear a heart monitor for a couple of weeks and the bulkiness of carrying around the monitoring device.

The cost of SweetBeatLife app itself is $9.99. The starter HealthPatch kit is $199 which includes 5 HealthPatch’s. Refills are $99.00 for 5 more HealthPatch’s. Due to the ongoing cost, I feel this as well will limit consumer adaption. But for the athlete that is training for an upcoming event, the risk of over training is very real and this app and monitoring system will likely be very useful. The benefits compared to other system is pretty simple once you stick the patch on your good to go, and there is nothing bulky attached to you.

I will have to admit though it was pretty cool to watch my heart beat on the app screen and compare my respiration rates to national averages and the host of other readings. The only final concern I have with any of these health apps is with Privacy. You are storing very private health information in the cloud, and largely with a unknown third party. There are currently no laws on the books to prevent the resale of collected information.

Disclaimer: SweetBeat and MySweetBeat are not medical devices or medical applications. SweetWater Health, L.L.C. does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Disclaimer: Geek News Central review of this device does not constitute a substitute for proper medical care, and anyone experiencing any health concern should seek the treatment of a licensed doctor. Information provided in this review is meant to be informational only, and not an endorsement of the device accuracy or health benefit.


Dario: Diabetes Management for the Smartphone


Eventually, I’ll have to really watch my blood sugar. I have a history of diabetes in the family. I remember when my brother had to carry the pouch around with him. Glucose monitors have gotten smaller, but still remained simple – reading your current blood sugar levels.

Enter in Labstyle Dario – the glucose monitor.

This is a device that uses your smartphone to record and remember your blood sugar information. The companion device holds strip cartridges (25 strips inside) that read your blood sugar.

The strip connects via your headphone socket to transfer information. The device works with iOS and Android devices through the app on December 12th. You can then monitor your blood sugar, get tips as to what you should eat so you don’t spike again, create a case history and journal and even send information to your doctor.

Of course, diabetes is a big issue. The International Diabetes Federation estimates an increase of 8.4% in 2012, which makes 371 million cases of Type 2 diabetes in adults. This is due to obesity and lack of exercise. They also expect the numbers to continue increasing over time.

Dario will debut in the US at the upcoming Geekdom. For more information, check out

HeartMath Inner Balance for iOS

HeartMath LogoIt’s a brave man who attempts to find inner balance at CES, but Jamie gives it a go with HeartMath‘s forthcoming Inner Balance.

HeartMath’s Inner Balance combines an iPhone app with a heart rate sensor, providing a feedback loop that helps people control their heart rate, relax and relieve stress. The sensor gently attaches to the earlobe and measures heart rate variability. The app uses a breath pacer and graphical display of the heart rate to help the person concentrate and control their breathing and pulse rate.

The Inner Balance sensor will be available in February for $99 and the free app can be downloaded from the Apple AppStore for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

Interview by Jamie Davis of Health Tech Weekly.

Support my Show Sponsor:
30% off on New GoDaddy Orders cjcgnc30
$.99 for a New or Transfered .com cjcgnc99 @
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain. Promo Code: cjcgnc1hs
$1.00 / mo Managed WordPress Hosting with free Domain. Promo Code: cjcgncwp1