Does “Seeds” Change Your View of Google Glass?

Google Glass logoWhat is your first thought when someone mentions Google Glass? It might bring up the antics of a few well known people who have behaved badly (or strangely) while using Google Glass. Or, you may be among those who have concerns about glass wearers recording you or taking your photo. In short, there are many who don’t necessarily view Google Glass through “rose colored glasses”, so to speak.

Google itself is aware of the negative perception that some people have of Google Glass. It put together a guide or Glass Explorers earlier this year. One of the suggestions included began with “Don’t be creepy or rude”.

Would a heartwarming film, that was shot entirely on Glass, change your view of Google’s innovative, wearable, product? “Seeds” (video below) was created by alumni and students from the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts as part of the Glass Creative Collective. This short film was shot entirely on Google Glass.

You see the film through the eyes of the main character, a man who is traveling far from home to visit with his mother. The filmmakers note that “Seeds” is their way of saying “Thank you, Mom”. It was released on YouTube shortly before Mother’s Day of this year.

I won’t give away the ending of the film in this blog. What I can say is that film is one that is designed to pull at the viewer’s heartstrings. It evokes strong, positive, emotions from the viewer. Could this “feel-good” film make people reconsider their view of Google Glass? I suspect that it might (even though the film was not intended to do so). It is a vivid example of someone who is out in public and using Google Glass in a way that doesn’t seem the least bit harassing to the people around him.

Livestream Reveals Boldest Product Update in 7 Years

Livestream LogoLivestream has revealed their biggest, boldest, broadcasting tool update in their 7 year history. The Livestream website has a new look and experience, and so does their iPhone app. At NAB 2014, Livestream had demonstrations of Livestream for Glass, Livestream Studio Control Surface, Livestream Studio HD510, Livestream Studio HD1710, and Livestream Studio.

Livestream for Glass enables Glass users to produce hands-free, live streaming video, from their Google Glass. It is the first broadcasting video app for Glass. First, you need to install Livestream for Glass. Next, pair it with a Livestream event. To open the app, say “Ok Glass, Livestream.” Tap the side of your device and you are live!

Livestream Studio Control Surface is a modular control surface with 5 assignable tracks. It has a T-Bar and audio mixer and a USB connection to Livestream Studio. Tactile controls give you quick access to critical functions, including full motorized audio mixing and assignable triggers for current and future Studio features. Studio Surface is compatible with any hardware or software edition of Studio.

Livestream Studio HD510 is the ultimate portable live production switcher. It has a built in touch-screen display and unique form factor. The HD510 gives you flexibility and performance on the go. It can be carried on a plane using the provided carry bag.

Livestream Studio HD1710 is a supercharged rack-mount switcher with bundled control surface. It is designed for control rooms, production trucks, venues and studios where rack mountable form factor is a must.

Livestream Studio has had an upgrade. The free version is now available with multi-camera support and audio mixing. Studio Version 2.0 was previewed at NAB 2014. The full release will become available in May of 2014.

XOEye Streaming Safety Glasses

XOEye LogoThere’s no doubt that wearables are where it’s at right now, but devices such as Google Glass or Recon goggles are very much luxury toys. XOEye Technologies have taken a more practical approach, developing safety glasses with built-in video cameras and microphones for use in business, typically manufacturing, construction and field service industry. Don and Todd talk to Aaron Salow, CEO of XOEye.

Currently in the prototype stage, the XOEye solution streams HD video and sound from the glasses across the internet to a remote viewing station, where an expert can review and discuss what the wearer is seeing, usually in an attempt to solve a problem. The wearer can hear the expert through small speakers installed on the glasses, so a conversation can take place between the wearer and the expert. Although still in the early stages of development, XOEye is exploring different materials for the glasses and a range of additional sensors, such as gyros and accelerometers, and other enhancements including a torch.

The final product is expected to come to market in June and there’s more information at www.xoeye.com.

Interview by Don Baine, the Gadget Professor and Todd Cochrane of Geek News Central for the TechPodcast Network.

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Using Google Glass to Automate Your Home

Wonder what Google Glass can do? How about fully automate your home! Vectorform, a company that develops new app technologies have come up with the concept to open a garage door, close shades or change the thermostat using Google Glass.

As Kevin Foreman said on the Vectorform blog:

After receiving our pairs of Glass, we’ve been ideating, designing, and developing with them over the last few weeks to see what new types of experiences they enable. In addition, I personally have decided to go “all in” with Glass, wearing the device throughout my entire day to find all of the benefits and drawbacks the device brings with it.  Follow me after the break to experience what it’s like to live with Google Glass.

4 ideas of Vectorform were accepted by Google explorer program. Of course, you will need a smart home and your Glass will need to be tethered to your smartphone so the commands can be delivered over Wifi.

Still, this concept shows us how Glass can change our hands-free lives.

 

Google Glass + Home Automation from Vectorform on Vimeo.

 

Welcome to the Wearable Device Revolution

With Google Glass rolling out to a select few, copycats making a glass alternative and the rumors of an iWatch coming from Apple, it’s safe to say we are now entering into the wearable device era. This is where we get rid of the bulky desktop, laptop and even iPads and have information coming to different parts of our bodies.

Google Glass

Google Glass expands our Eyes

I am slated to get my Glass in the next couple weeks. For those who have Glass, they experience a new way to take photos, get navigation and try some of the new apps coming out for this wearable devices. In hearing all the stories of Glass, I have not heard anyone say much bad stuff about the headgear – as in wishing they never bought glass. There have been concerns about the battery being close to the head and the fact it was grossly underpowered for the $1,500 price tag.

When Glass becomes a consumer product, that $1,500 price tag will most likely drop to 1/3 that. The design looks pretty bulky right now – expect it to be more streamlined in the consumer model.

Of course, this will make our way to actual glasses with the device attached. Maybe even a contact that will use kinetic power to run.

ruputer

iWatch Expands our Wrists

The rumors of Apple coming out with a bluetooth connect watch to let us glance at our wrists without pulling out the phone for text messages, phone numbers and more (like when your Clash of Clan’s canon has been upgraded or the shield is running out). The watch will probably work like a nano – with music storage and limited apps.

Its not the first watch – related technology out there. Back in the 90’s, the Ruputer was one of the first computer watches out there that could connect to a computer. More recent, items like the pebble watch have been out for a while. Companies like Sony, Fitbit and more are using your wrists to monitor your health – which will most likely be incorporated in the iWatch.

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What is Next in Wearable technology?

I remember listening to Dr. Michio Kaku a couple years back in what he expects to see in the next 50 years. Intelligent toilets and pills that can explore the body and send the details back to a doctor are some of the things he mentioned. But what else could we see?

Maybe a T-shirt that warms you up when cold or cools you down when hot? Last week we learned about the science of a 3D printed cast they are developing – being lighter and better in the healing process because air and water can get to the arm or leg with the web-like structure. What if sensors were put in that cast so your device can monitor not only if the cast breaks but if blood flow gets obstructed during the healing process? It could then transmit to your doctor the second it detected a problem.

Remember Marty Mcfly’s shoes from Back to the Future? Those are really around the corner – and we’ve already connected shoes to a mobile device. A pacemaker has wireless connectivity to collect data and report problems.

What other items can we come up with in the next 50 years as the Wearable device revolution gets into full swing? Comment below!