Twitter Rolls Out Read Receipts on Direct Messages



Twitter iconTwitter is rolling out something new in its Direct Messages feature. When this feature is fully rolled out, it will enable anyone on Twitter who sends another user a Direct Message a read receipt – letting the sender know when (or if) the receiver read the DM. Do we really need this on Twitter?

The Twitter information about Direct Messages explains the read receipt addition this way:

Direct Messages feature read receipts so you know when people have seen your messages. When someone sends you a Direct Message and your Send/Receive read receipts setting is enabled, everyone in the conversation will know when you’ve seen it. This setting is enabled by default but you can turn it off (or back on) through your settings at any time. If you turn off the Send/Receive read receipts setting, you will not be able to see read receipts from other people.

The same information page has instructions about how to turn off the Send/Receive read receipts setting if you don’t want to use it. Turn it off, and you won’t get a read receipt message when you send a DM to another Twitter user. It is unclear if those other people, who have decided to leave the Send/Receive read receipt messages feature on, will still be able to tell when you have read their DM.

Do we really need a read receipt feature on Twitter? Is anyone actually sending Twitter Direct Messages that are so vitally important that they must know the instant the other person reads it?

People who need to connect with co-workers that live in across the country, or around the world, from them tend to use Slack. Everyone can see what the group has been talking about on Slack and respond to it whenever they see it. If you need to set up a meeting, it’s fairly easy to get everyone on Skype at the same time and have a discussion together. Why is Twitter trying to re-invent the wheel when we already have at least two functional wheels?

The Verge points out that the new read receipts feature could suggest that Twitter is working on making its Direct Messaging service have the capabilities of a standalone chat app. That’s a reasonable assumption.

The problem is that Twitter’s chat app will have limitations the other chat apps do not. People leave Twitter because Twitter has a huge problem with harassment. You might find that using Slack, Skype, or another chat app lets you connect to more people than Twitter can.