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Syma S107G Helicopter Review

Posted by Andrew at 3:59 PM on September 18, 2013

According to the packaging, the Syma S107G is an “alloy infrared remote control helicopter ” with “3.5 channel gyro system” but all you need to know is that it’s an easy-to-fly toy helicopter, tremendous fun and very inexpensive. Anything else is superfluous.

In the box, there’s a helicopter, a remote control unit, a USB charging cable and few spare blades to help with the odd accident or two. The ‘copter measures about 22 cm from nose to tail, with a similar rotor diameter. If you haven’t seen these toys before, they have contra-rotating main blades which keeps the helicopter stable in the air and the rear rotor controls forwards and backwards, rather than rotation. There’s no cyclic pitch here, fortunately.

Syma S107G

The remote control unit is designed to be used with both hands. The throttle lies under the left thumb and directional control is looked after by the right, with action for forwards, backwards, rotate left and rotate right. A knurled knob in the middle of the unit adjusts the rotational trim. Six AA batteries power the handset which may seem like overkill but a small cable stored in the unit can be used to recharge the helicopter’s battery. The S107G’s battery can also be recharged via a supplied USB cable and recharging typically takes around 40 minutes.

Remote Control Unit

The helicopter itself is largely of metal construction, with a plastic nose-cone. After surviving a number of horrific crashes, my opinion is that the S107G is pretty sturdy, especially for the price, but it is eventually going to break. Spare rotor blades are provided in the box but as yet I’ve not had to use any of them and the included instructions suggest that a range of spares can be ordered too. A slider switch turns the ‘copter on and off, and a small charging port takes the recharging cable.

Flying the helicopter is easy as long as you have some level of sensitivity and hand-eye co-ordination. With a little throttle, the helicopter will take-off and hover. Too much throttle and you’ll be hitting the ceiling. Just take it gently. Once the up-and-down has been mastered, rotating left and right will turn the helicopter on the spot. Finally forwards and backwards completes the range of motions but it’s a little trickier to master. Providing you have a sufficient space, you’ll be flying figure 8s in no time.

The S107G is definitely an indoor toy as the helicopter is light and any wind will overpower it. My attempts to fly the S107G outside usually ended up with the chopper in the hedge. Even within a room, flying close to walls and ceilings will affect the flight from reflected air currents, making it much more challenging to fly. Overall the ‘copter is very easy to fly and control, especially in a larger room and in terms of flight time, you’ll get a little over five minutes of flying before a recharge is needed.

S107G Blades Whirring

But this is all irrelevant. All you need to know is that flying the S107G is easy and enormous fun. My daughter and I had a great time with my helicopter chasing her remote control car round a room, or rescuing Lego people from an imaginary disaster.

The S107G is available in three colours from Amazon.co.uk / Amazon.com for just £13.50 / $20 which is a ridiculously cheap price when you consider the technology inside these devices. Indulge your inner Airwolf.

(Disclosure – the Syma S107G was a personal purchase.)

5 Comments

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